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KANBAN

Discuss KANBAN within the Production Management ( Prod Mgmt) forums, part of the Resolve Your Query - Get Help and discuss Projects category; KANBAN Introduction to Kanban A system of continuous supply of components, parts and supplies, such that workers have what they ...

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KANBAN
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themaharana
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KANBAN - June 7th, 2006

KANBAN

Introduction to Kanban
A system of continuous supply of components, parts and supplies, such that workers have what they need, where they need it, when they need it.
The word Kan means "card" in Japanese and the word "ban" means "signal". So Kanban refers to "signal cards".

Here's how Kanban works:
Let's say one of the components needed to make widgets is a 42" stem-bolt and it arrives on pallets. There are 100 stem-bolts on a pallet. When the pallet is empty, the person assembling the widgets takes a card that was attached to the pallet and sends it to the stem-bolt manufacturing area. Another pallet of stem-bolts is then manufactured and sent to the widget assembler.
A new pallet of stem-bolts is not made until a card is received.
This is Kanban, in it's simplest form.
A more realistic example would probably involve at least two pallets. The widget assembler would start working from the second A-bolts to be sent to the widget assembly stations.

In the case of many manufacturing plants, the supplier is the warehouse and the customer is the assembly line. In this case, one box of components goes to the correct station at the assembly line at a time. When the box is empty, an operator takes it back to the warehouse, and this automatically triggers the delivery of the next box of components. Since only the transport Kanban is used, this example represents the application of the simple Kanban system.
Toyota of Japan has taken the example discussed above one step further. Here, certain components are directly supplied from suppliers to the production line. Stock levels are therefore kept low and factory overhead can be reduced. The supplier's workstations are regulated by the production Kanban, which in turn is regulated by the transportation Kanban from Toyota's production lines. The transport Kanban is simultaneously used internally between the warehouse and the production lines. This is an excellent example of the integrated Kanban system.

An Alternative Kanban Model
Kanban can also operate like a supermarket. A small stock of every component needed to make a widget would be stored in a specific location with a fixed space allocation for each component. The widget assemblers come to the "supermarket" and select the components they need. As each component is removed from the shelf, a message is sent to a "regional warehouse" or component manufacturing facility, requesting that the component be replaced. The "supermarket" might then receive a daily shipment of replacement components, exactly replacing those that were used.
If we just change the term "supermarket" to "warehouse" we have our manufacturing example.
This "supermarket" model is different from the first Kanban example in that it would be used when components are manufactured in facilities that are distant from the widget assembly plant. Instead of moving around small quantities of components, larger quantities are shipped once a day to the centralized warehouse.
JIT - Just In Time / Continual Improvement
Kanban is directly associated with Just-In-Time (JIT) delivery. However, Kanban is not another name for just-in-time delivery. It is a part of a larger JIT system. There is more to managing a JIT system than just Kanban and there is more to Kanban than just inventory management.
For example, Kanban also involves industrial re-engineering. This means that production areas might be changed from locating machines by function, to creating "cells" of equipment and employees. The cells allow related products to be manufactured in a continuous flow.
Kanban involves employees as team members who are responsible for specific work activities. Teams and individuals are encouraged participate in continuously improving the Kanban processes and the overall production process.







What Are The Benefits of Kanban?
Kanban provides a number of benefits.
Reduce inventory and product obsolescence.
Since component parts are not delivered until just before they are needed, there is a reduced need for storage space. Should a product or component design be upgraded, that upgrade can be included in the final product ASAP. There is no inventory of products or components that become obsolete.
This fits well with the Kaizen system on continual improvement. Product designs can be upgraded in small increments on a continual basis, and those upgrades are immediately incorporated into the product with no waste from obsolete components or parts.
Reduces waste and scrap
With Kanban, products and components are only manufactured when they are needed. This eliminates overproduction. Raw materials are not delivered until they are needed, reducing waste and cutting storage costs.
Provides flexibility in production
If there is asudden drop in demand for a product, Kanban ensures you are not stuck with excess inventory. This gives you the flexibility to rapidly respond to a changing demand.
Kanban also provides flexibility in how your production lines are used. Production areas are not locked in by their supply chain. They can quickly be switched to different products as demand for various products changes. Yes, there are still limits imposed by the types of machines and equipment, and employee skills, however the supply of raw materials and components is eliminated as a bottleneck.
Increases Output
The flow of Kanban (cards, bins, pallets, etc.) will stop if there is a production problem. This makes problems visible quickly, allowing them to be corrected ASAP.
Kanban reduces wait times by making supplies more accessible and breaking down administrative barriers. This results in an increase in production using the same resources.
Reduces Total Cost
The Kanban system reduces your total costs by:
• Preventing Over Production
• Developing Flexible Work Stations
• Reducing Waste and Scrap
• Minimizing Wait Times and Logistics Costs
• Reducing Stock Levels and Overhead Costs
• Saving Resources by Streamlining Production
• Reducing Inventory Costs
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Re: KANBAN
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Re: KANBAN - June 8th, 2006

Nice Post @ themaharana ..C that Next Time u Copy the material in a Word Pad and then Upload it so that Members can download it Quickly



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Jitendra Mazee
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Re: KANBAN - February 22nd, 2016

Quote:
Originally Posted by themaharana View Post
KANBAN

Introduction to Kanban
A system of continuous supply of components, parts and supplies, such that workers have what they need, where they need it, when they need it.
The word Kan means "card" in Japanese and the word "ban" means "signal". So Kanban refers to "signal cards".

Here's how Kanban works:
Let's say one of the components needed to make widgets is a 42" stem-bolt and it arrives on pallets. There are 100 stem-bolts on a pallet. When the pallet is empty, the person assembling the widgets takes a card that was attached to the pallet and sends it to the stem-bolt manufacturing area. Another pallet of stem-bolts is then manufactured and sent to the widget assembler.
A new pallet of stem-bolts is not made until a card is received.
This is Kanban, in it's simplest form.
A more realistic example would probably involve at least two pallets. The widget assembler would start working from the second A-bolts to be sent to the widget assembly stations.

In the case of many manufacturing plants, the supplier is the warehouse and the customer is the assembly line. In this case, one box of components goes to the correct station at the assembly line at a time. When the box is empty, an operator takes it back to the warehouse, and this automatically triggers the delivery of the next box of components. Since only the transport Kanban is used, this example represents the application of the simple Kanban system.
Toyota of Japan has taken the example discussed above one step further. Here, certain components are directly supplied from suppliers to the production line. Stock levels are therefore kept low and factory overhead can be reduced. The supplier's workstations are regulated by the production Kanban, which in turn is regulated by the transportation Kanban from Toyota's production lines. The transport Kanban is simultaneously used internally between the warehouse and the production lines. This is an excellent example of the integrated Kanban system.

An Alternative Kanban Model
Kanban can also operate like a supermarket. A small stock of every component needed to make a widget would be stored in a specific location with a fixed space allocation for each component. The widget assemblers come to the "supermarket" and select the components they need. As each component is removed from the shelf, a message is sent to a "regional warehouse" or component manufacturing facility, requesting that the component be replaced. The "supermarket" might then receive a daily shipment of replacement components, exactly replacing those that were used.
If we just change the term "supermarket" to "warehouse" we have our manufacturing example.
This "supermarket" model is different from the first Kanban example in that it would be used when components are manufactured in facilities that are distant from the widget assembly plant. Instead of moving around small quantities of components, larger quantities are shipped once a day to the centralized warehouse.
JIT - Just In Time / Continual Improvement
Kanban is directly associated with Just-In-Time (JIT) delivery. However, Kanban is not another name for just-in-time delivery. It is a part of a larger JIT system. There is more to managing a JIT system than just Kanban and there is more to Kanban than just inventory management.
For example, Kanban also involves industrial re-engineering. This means that production areas might be changed from locating machines by function, to creating "cells" of equipment and employees. The cells allow related products to be manufactured in a continuous flow.
Kanban involves employees as team members who are responsible for specific work activities. Teams and individuals are encouraged participate in continuously improving the Kanban processes and the overall production process.







What Are The Benefits of Kanban?
Kanban provides a number of benefits.
Reduce inventory and product obsolescence.
Since component parts are not delivered until just before they are needed, there is a reduced need for storage space. Should a product or component design be upgraded, that upgrade can be included in the final product ASAP. There is no inventory of products or components that become obsolete.
This fits well with the Kaizen system on continual improvement. Product designs can be upgraded in small increments on a continual basis, and those upgrades are immediately incorporated into the product with no waste from obsolete components or parts.
Reduces waste and scrap
With Kanban, products and components are only manufactured when they are needed. This eliminates overproduction. Raw materials are not delivered until they are needed, reducing waste and cutting storage costs.
Provides flexibility in production
If there is asudden drop in demand for a product, Kanban ensures you are not stuck with excess inventory. This gives you the flexibility to rapidly respond to a changing demand.
Kanban also provides flexibility in how your production lines are used. Production areas are not locked in by their supply chain. They can quickly be switched to different products as demand for various products changes. Yes, there are still limits imposed by the types of machines and equipment, and employee skills, however the supply of raw materials and components is eliminated as a bottleneck.
Increases Output
The flow of Kanban (cards, bins, pallets, etc.) will stop if there is a production problem. This makes problems visible quickly, allowing them to be corrected ASAP.
Kanban reduces wait times by making supplies more accessible and breaking down administrative barriers. This results in an increase in production using the same resources.
Reduces Total Cost
The Kanban system reduces your total costs by:
• Preventing Over Production
• Developing Flexible Work Stations
• Reducing Waste and Scrap
• Minimizing Wait Times and Logistics Costs
• Reducing Stock Levels and Overhead Costs
• Saving Resources by Streamlining Production
• Reducing Inventory Costs
Hey friend, thanks for the valuable information on KANBAN. I am really hearing this term for the first time but when i searched then i got some interesting points about it. So i am uploading it and want you to check it. Well, KANBAN is a system where the supply of components is controlled through the usage of an instruction card
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