Go Back   ManagementParadise.com | Management & Business Education Learning Platform PUBLISH / UPLOAD PROJECT OR DOWNLOAD REFERENCE PROJECT > Marketing Research ( MR )

Marketing Research of UTStarcom

Discuss Marketing Research of UTStarcom within the Marketing Research ( MR ) forums, part of the PUBLISH / UPLOAD PROJECT OR DOWNLOAD REFERENCE PROJECT category; UTStarcom is a Fortune 1000 company that specializes in IP-based networking products for telecommunications companies and service providers. Its core ...

Reply

 

Thread Tools Display Modes
Marketing Research of UTStarcom
Old
 (1 (permalink))
Netra Shetty
netrashetty is on a distinguished road
 
netrashetty
Student of PGDM at Mats Institute of Management and Entrepreneurship
Bangalore, Karnataka
Management Paradise Guru
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 4,857
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Bangalore, Karnataka
Marketing Research of UTStarcom - April 9th, 2011

UTStarcom is a Fortune 1000 company that specializes in IP-based networking products for telecommunications companies and service providers. Its core markets are multimedia communications and broadband, including IP and entertainment (IPTV), next generation broadband networks and optical network solutions. It also sells handsets and other consumer products including DSL modems and Voice over IP terminal adapters. It has a large customer base in Asia, particularly in China, where it manufactures the majority of its products and where most of its employees are located. It also has business operations in the United States, India, Ireland, France and Japan as well as research and design operations in the United States, China, Korea and India.

the twentieth century drew to a close, the U.S. printing and publishing industry experienced unparalleled demand for its products. Despite intense competition from the electronic media and people’s scarcity of leisure time, the industry’s value of shipments from the sale of newspapers, periodicals, books, and trade advertising materials climbed steadily, reaching an estimated $184 billion in 1992 dollars in 1999. Profit margins also advanced, aided by a pattern of low prices in materials costs—especially paper—and gains in worker productivity. Employment in printing and publishing had moderate growth through the decade of the 1990s, exceeding 1.5 million by 1999, but competition and consolidation reduced the number of establishments to an estimated 62,000 in 1999 from 65,000 a decade earlier.

Attending to the informational needs of the huge domestic market is the primary focus of U.S. printers and publishers, but the industry is an active participant in the international economy as well and thus is subject to global forces. These critical forces include changes in technology, new opportunities in global markets, international sourcing of equipment and supplies, and increased cross-border investment. Technology.

The move toward digital (electronic) technology has influenced the world’s publishers as well as printers. The previous technology—analog—was based on film, plate, andchemical processes that required intermediary operations before textual input was ready for the printing press. Digital technology removes those intermediary activities and binds the production ties between printers and publishers more closely. The decades ahead will witness a sorting-out process that will determine which parts of the production process will be done at publishers’ offices and which tasks will be accomplished at the printing plant.
Printing is more than just producing books, newspapers, and magazines. The process printing process also affects other industries including packaging, advertising, textiles, as well as more mundane items suc as currency, wallpaper, postage stamps, product labels, billboards, lampshades, etc.

The printing industry includes establishments engaged in the following:

Printing on apparel and textile products, paper, metal, glass, plastics, and other materials, except fabric
Performing prepress (e.g., plate making, typesetting) and post press services (e.g., book binding) in support of printing activities
The process includes lithographic, gravure, screen, flexography, digital, and letter press processes. End users of printing processes include newspapers, magazines, catalogs, signs, brochures, mailings, business forms, other advertising materials as well as the broad range of labels used in product packaging.

Printers and publishers in the world’s major economies face mature domestic markets in which constraints on expansion often encourage a more global view. This is especially true in European countries such as France, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain, and the United Kingdom, where exports of printed products account for 10 to 20 percent of the industry’s total revenues. The United States engages in the world’s largest trade in printed products. Exports of U.S. books, periodicals, and trade advertising materials totaled approximately $4.5 billion in 1999, while imports of printed products reached $3.5 billion. The strongest demand for U.S. printed materials is found in Canada, the United Kingdom, Mexico, Japan, and Australia. Efforts by U.S. printers and publishers to establish larger markets in Latin America and the countries of the Pacific Rim are determined largely by literacy and income levels and the relative strength of regional economies.

Trends in the acquisition of equipment and supplies find the world’s printers and publishersfulfilling more of their requirements from international sources. Digital printing presses from Belgium, platesetters from Canada, and text processors and software from the United States point to the globalization of graphic arts equipment. Material inputs also are sourced globally, with ink supplied by the United States, the Netherlands, and Japan and paper obtained from the United States, Canada, and the Scandinavian countries. To a degree, this trend is countered by the large U.S. market for printed products, which encourages foreign suppliers and equipment manufacturers to establish plants in the United States.

The opening of foreign markets to investment opportunities has been seized on by the world’s major printing and publishing companies. The leading attraction for foreign investment has been the United States, where up to 50 percent of the largest book and periodical firms are foreign-owned and the second largest printer is headquartered in Canada. U.S. printers have sought market opportunities abroad by merging, acquiring, or establishing printing plants throughout Europe, Asia, and Latin America. The U.S. book and periodical publishing industries are also active internationally through product licensing and joint ventures. This expansion of global publishing is in part the result of greater worldwide protection of intellectual property, a priority of the governments in nations with major publishing economies for the last two decades.

Primary raw materials used in the printing industry are paper and ink. Some other materials used in the process include photo processing, plate making materials, oils for machine lubricating, as well as preparation and cleaning solutions. Many types of ink are utilized in printing and vary depending on the procedures and products desired. The printing industry has embraced recent green initiatives and is pushing towards the use of more environmentally friendly inks and solvents.
Advertisements


Last edited by netrashetty; April 9th, 2011 at 12:18 PM..
   
Friends: (0)
Reply With Quote
Re: Marketing Research of UTStarcom
Old
 (2 (permalink))
Jitendra Mazee
jitendra05 is on a distinguished road
 
jitendra05
Student of Bachelor of Engineering at RGTU Bhopal
Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh
Management Paradise Guru
 
Institute: RGTU Bhopal
Status: Offline
Posts: 27,848
Join Date: Jan 2016
Location: Bhopal, Madhya Pradesh
Re: Marketing Research of UTStarcom - August 17th, 2016

Quote:
Originally Posted by netrashetty View Post
UTStarcom is a Fortune 1000 company that specializes in IP-based networking products for telecommunications companies and service providers. Its core markets are multimedia communications and broadband, including IP and entertainment (IPTV), next generation broadband networks and optical network solutions. It also sells handsets and other consumer products including DSL modems and Voice over IP terminal adapters. It has a large customer base in Asia, particularly in China, where it manufactures the majority of its products and where most of its employees are located. It also has business operations in the United States, India, Ireland, France and Japan as well as research and design operations in the United States, China, Korea and India.

the twentieth century drew to a close, the U.S. printing and publishing industry experienced unparalleled demand for its products. Despite intense competition from the electronic media and people’s scarcity of leisure time, the industry’s value of shipments from the sale of newspapers, periodicals, books, and trade advertising materials climbed steadily, reaching an estimated $184 billion in 1992 dollars in 1999. Profit margins also advanced, aided by a pattern of low prices in materials costs—especially paper—and gains in worker productivity. Employment in printing and publishing had moderate growth through the decade of the 1990s, exceeding 1.5 million by 1999, but competition and consolidation reduced the number of establishments to an estimated 62,000 in 1999 from 65,000 a decade earlier.

Attending to the informational needs of the huge domestic market is the primary focus of U.S. printers and publishers, but the industry is an active participant in the international economy as well and thus is subject to global forces. These critical forces include changes in technology, new opportunities in global markets, international sourcing of equipment and supplies, and increased cross-border investment. Technology.

The move toward digital (electronic) technology has influenced the world’s publishers as well as printers. The previous technology—analog—was based on film, plate, andchemical processes that required intermediary operations before textual input was ready for the printing press. Digital technology removes those intermediary activities and binds the production ties between printers and publishers more closely. The decades ahead will witness a sorting-out process that will determine which parts of the production process will be done at publishers’ offices and which tasks will be accomplished at the printing plant.
Printing is more than just producing books, newspapers, and magazines. The process printing process also affects other industries including packaging, advertising, textiles, as well as more mundane items suc as currency, wallpaper, postage stamps, product labels, billboards, lampshades, etc.

The printing industry includes establishments engaged in the following:

Printing on apparel and textile products, paper, metal, glass, plastics, and other materials, except fabric
Performing prepress (e.g., plate making, typesetting) and post press services (e.g., book binding) in support of printing activities
The process includes lithographic, gravure, screen, flexography, digital, and letter press processes. End users of printing processes include newspapers, magazines, catalogs, signs, brochures, mailings, business forms, other advertising materials as well as the broad range of labels used in product packaging.

Printers and publishers in the world’s major economies face mature domestic markets in which constraints on expansion often encourage a more global view. This is especially true in European countries such as France, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain, and the United Kingdom, where exports of printed products account for 10 to 20 percent of the industry’s total revenues. The United States engages in the world’s largest trade in printed products. Exports of U.S. books, periodicals, and trade advertising materials totaled approximately $4.5 billion in 1999, while imports of printed products reached $3.5 billion. The strongest demand for U.S. printed materials is found in Canada, the United Kingdom, Mexico, Japan, and Australia. Efforts by U.S. printers and publishers to establish larger markets in Latin America and the countries of the Pacific Rim are determined largely by literacy and income levels and the relative strength of regional economies.

Trends in the acquisition of equipment and supplies find the world’s printers and publishersfulfilling more of their requirements from international sources. Digital printing presses from Belgium, platesetters from Canada, and text processors and software from the United States point to the globalization of graphic arts equipment. Material inputs also are sourced globally, with ink supplied by the United States, the Netherlands, and Japan and paper obtained from the United States, Canada, and the Scandinavian countries. To a degree, this trend is countered by the large U.S. market for printed products, which encourages foreign suppliers and equipment manufacturers to establish plants in the United States.

The opening of foreign markets to investment opportunities has been seized on by the world’s major printing and publishing companies. The leading attraction for foreign investment has been the United States, where up to 50 percent of the largest book and periodical firms are foreign-owned and the second largest printer is headquartered in Canada. U.S. printers have sought market opportunities abroad by merging, acquiring, or establishing printing plants throughout Europe, Asia, and Latin America. The U.S. book and periodical publishing industries are also active internationally through product licensing and joint ventures. This expansion of global publishing is in part the result of greater worldwide protection of intellectual property, a priority of the governments in nations with major publishing economies for the last two decades.

Primary raw materials used in the printing industry are paper and ink. Some other materials used in the process include photo processing, plate making materials, oils for machine lubricating, as well as preparation and cleaning solutions. Many types of ink are utilized in printing and vary depending on the procedures and products desired. The printing industry has embraced recent green initiatives and is pushing towards the use of more environmentally friendly inks and solvents.
Well netra, i am really glad to see that people like you are sharing such an important information on UTStarcom and helping people in their projects and research works. BTW, i am also going to upload a document which would give more useful information on UTStarcom.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf UTStarcom.pdf (44.7 KB, 0 views)
Friends: (0)
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
advertising research, careers in marketing, consumer marketing, economic trends, environmental scanning, government regulations, international marketing, market segmentation, market structure, marketing, marketing campaigns, marketing environment, marketing mix, marketing research, mr of us company, mr on us company, pre-testing, product research, qualitative marketing, research methods, research plan, role of marketing, technological advances, types of marketing, us company
Related to Marketing Research of UTStarcom
 

Similar Threads

Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Marketing Mix of UTStarcom Abhijeet S Marketing Management 1 November 28th, 2017 02:26 PM
Customer Relationship Management of UTStarcom Netra Shetty Marketing Management 1 August 25th, 2017 05:11 PM
Financial Analysis of UTStarcom Netra Shetty Financial Management 0 February 15th, 2011 02:25 PM
Organisational Structure of UTStarcom Netra Shetty Human Resources Management (H.R) 0 February 7th, 2011 10:59 AM
SWOT ANALYSIS ON UTStarcom Abhijeet S Principles of Management ( P.O.M) 0 December 1st, 2010 11:09 AM
 


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


ManagementParadise.com is not responsible for the views and opinion of the posters. The posters and only posters shall be liable for any copyright infringement.



Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.