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Netra Shetty
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Marketing Research of Renys - April 8th, 2011

enys is a chain of department stores located in Maine that has been a part of Maine culture since 1949. Robert H. Reny opened his first store in Damariscotta, Maine. In 2004, two of his sons began running the chain.
The company motto is "A Maine Adventure."
In Fortune Magazine's Small Business column, Renys was cited as an example of a small business doing well in the face of competition from Wal-Mart. Renys management studied the competition and realized the company could have an advantage in clothing. They purchase small lots of high quality brands at a discount by buying production overruns, closeouts, irregulars, and factory seconds.[1]
The company headquarters and distribution center are located in Newcastle. There are currently 14 retail store locations, located in Bath, Belfast, Bridgton, Camden, Damariscotta (two stores), Dexter, Ellsworth, Farmington, Gardiner, Madison, Pittsfield, Saco, and Wells. A 15th location in downtown Portland will be opening in spring of 2011.[2]

The Mobile Research Conference Programme Committee is proud to announce the final speaker line-up for MRC 2011 on 18-19 April 2011 in central London.
Paul Berney, Mobile Marketing Association CMO and Managing Director (EMEA), and Peter Lynn, Professor of Survey Methodology at the University of Essex, join the already announced Dr Nathan Eagle of txteagle and Bruce Hoang of Orange Advertising Network as keynote speakers.

Paul Berney will reveal the different trends in mobile marketing and what they mean for mobile market research, while Peter Lynn will provide practical guidance on how to demonstrate the advantages of quality mobile research to clients.

The rest of the two-day programme will share experiences and debate best practices. Case studies from brands including BSkyB and HELLO! Magazine will showcase how they’ve leveraged mobile phones to engage individuals and capture more immediate, in-the-moment feedback to build brand and insights.

Other hot mobile research topics including mobile internet audience measurement, using voice recognition for open-ended mobile surveys, applying location analytics, and integrating mobile and social media to ensure utmost convenience for respondents.

Speakers tackling these burning issues through presentations and panel discussions include AJ Johnson of Ipsos, Tiphaine Goisbeault of Médiamétrie, Guy Rolfe of Kantar, Nicole Bensky and Justin Bailey of The Nielsen Company, Dr Michael Bosnjak of Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Karin Rothstock of Tomorrow Focus, Sean Con

Brown and Thaddeus Fulford-Jones of Locately. Sessions will be chaired by Dr Liz Nelson, Chair of the MRC Committee, and Tim Macer, Managing Director of Meaning Ltd.

Dr Nelson, Chair of the Programme Committee told us:
“It’s with great pleasure that I announce the final programme for Globalpark’s Mobile Research Conference 2011. Mobile offers us some practical and wondrous research solutions. The conference line up will discuss these and best practice without shying away from looking at the challenges.”

Market Structure
The boat dealership industry comprises traditional powerboats, personal watercrafts, kayaks and sailboats.

The U.S. pleasure boat industry has had several years of growth, with real domestic shipments growing 3 percent annually from 1992 to 1998 (see Table 39-12). Over that period, real apparent consumption also rose, growing 5 percent annually, thanks mostly to an annual growth rate of 22 percent in U.S. imports of pleasure boats. The boating industry has kept pace with the national economy, which grew 3 percent annually from 1992 to 1998 as measured by real GDP. Growth in personal income and consumer spending have been the highlights of GDP growth, and those factors are key indicators of growth for the boating industry. Real disposable personal income grew 2 percent annually from 1992 to 1998, while total real personal consumption expenditures grew 3 percent annually over that period. Real personal consumption expenditures on boats increased 15 percent annually over that period.

However, in 1999, the boating industry saw growth slow down while the national economy continued to have strong growth. In the first 6 months of 1999, GDP and disposable personal income each increased 4 percent compared with the first 6 months of 1998, while personal consumption expenditures increased 5 percent in real terms after double-digit annual growth from 1992 through 1998. In 1999, real domestic shipments increased an estimated 1 percent, totaling $6.2 billion in current dollars. Fueled by an estimated 10 percent growth in U.S. boat imports, apparent consumption increased 2.3 percent in real terms. Several indicators for the boat industry began to slow or decline. While consumers continued to spend, they began to dip into savings in 1999. Savings as a percentage of disposable income averaged -1 percent in the first half of 1999. The ratio of consumer debt to personal income also remained high, above 18 percent, for the fifth consecutive year. In addition, interest rates increased modestly throughout the first half of the year. These indicators made consumers more concerned about taking on the significant additional debt associated with the purchase of a boat. This consumer wariness can be measured to a degree by consumer expectations surveys. According to a University of Michigan survey, consumers’ expectations dipped in the first half of 1999, down 3.8 percent from 1998. Indicators such as consumer expectations were at or near record highs. It is likely that the negative growth may only slow growth in the industry rather than signaling a decline. In addition, some manufacturers are reporting a shift of consumer preferences toward larger, more expensive boats, offsetting any negative growth trends in the industry. Industry shipments were expected to increase almost 1 percent in 1999 in 1992 dollars.

A further concern of the boating industry in regard to today’s consumers is whether they continue to enjoy boating. Participation in boating and boating activities declined over the last 10 years. According to an NSGA survey, 25.7 million people participated in power and motor boating in 1998, down from 32.5 million in 1988. Participation in sailing decreased from 6.7 million to 3.6 million individuals from 1988 to 1998. Several activities associated with boating also declined, such as water skiing and fishing. Over that period, participation in water skiing dropped from 12.8 million to 7.2 million individuals. Fishing lost 2.1 million individuals from 1988 to 1998, when it had 43.6 million participants. Overdevelopment of water locations, higher participation costs versus those for other recreational activities, and a lack of a concerted effort to promote the activity are the reasons most commonly cited for the decline in participation.

Global Industry Trends

Despite the potential of international E-commerce, foreign market demand has been weak over the last several years. U.S. exports of pleasure boats fell 1 percent annually from 1992 through 1998. In 1999, U.S. exports were estimated to lose over 1 percent. Overall economic conditions in many overseas markets have not been as strong as those in the U.S. market. Real GDP growth in the top 20 overseas markets, as weighted by U.S. total manufacturing exports, increased only 2 percent in 1998 and an estimated 1.8 percent in 1999 compared with 3.9 percent and an estimated 3.5 percent for the U.S. market in 1998 and 1999, respectively. As was the case more recently in the United States, this probably meant that consumer confidence and disposable income growth were lower, making consumers slightly more apprehensive about buying a boat. In addition, it is likely that less was spent on capital investments, particularly marina development. Furthermore, overseas pleasure boat markets are smaller and therefore typically have fewer dealers and distributors that are willing to take risks when the economy is weak or unstable.

The U.S. pleasure boat market is the largest in the world. U.S. consumption of pleasure boats and marine accessories accounts for an estimated 60 percent of the worldwide market for such products. Typically, U.S. manufacturers hope for a strong U.S. market to bolster sales and profits. A strong U.S. market also helps exports to a degree, as economies of scale are an important factor in the production of boats. If U.S. manufacturers are able to produce a large number of boats for the U.S. market, prices will decline for domestic and international buyers, making the U.S. firms more price-competitive overseas.
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Jitendra Mazee
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Re: Marketing Research of Renys - August 1st, 2016

Quote:
Originally Posted by netrashetty View Post
enys is a chain of department stores located in Maine that has been a part of Maine culture since 1949. Robert H. Reny opened his first store in Damariscotta, Maine. In 2004, two of his sons began running the chain.
The company motto is "A Maine Adventure."
In Fortune Magazine's Small Business column, Renys was cited as an example of a small business doing well in the face of competition from Wal-Mart. Renys management studied the competition and realized the company could have an advantage in clothing. They purchase small lots of high quality brands at a discount by buying production overruns, closeouts, irregulars, and factory seconds.[1]
The company headquarters and distribution center are located in Newcastle. There are currently 14 retail store locations, located in Bath, Belfast, Bridgton, Camden, Damariscotta (two stores), Dexter, Ellsworth, Farmington, Gardiner, Madison, Pittsfield, Saco, and Wells. A 15th location in downtown Portland will be opening in spring of 2011.[2]

The Mobile Research Conference Programme Committee is proud to announce the final speaker line-up for MRC 2011 on 18-19 April 2011 in central London.
Paul Berney, Mobile Marketing Association CMO and Managing Director (EMEA), and Peter Lynn, Professor of Survey Methodology at the University of Essex, join the already announced Dr Nathan Eagle of txteagle and Bruce Hoang of Orange Advertising Network as keynote speakers.

Paul Berney will reveal the different trends in mobile marketing and what they mean for mobile market research, while Peter Lynn will provide practical guidance on how to demonstrate the advantages of quality mobile research to clients.

The rest of the two-day programme will share experiences and debate best practices. Case studies from brands including BSkyB and HELLO! Magazine will showcase how they’ve leveraged mobile phones to engage individuals and capture more immediate, in-the-moment feedback to build brand and insights.

Other hot mobile research topics including mobile internet audience measurement, using voice recognition for open-ended mobile surveys, applying location analytics, and integrating mobile and social media to ensure utmost convenience for respondents.

Speakers tackling these burning issues through presentations and panel discussions include AJ Johnson of Ipsos, Tiphaine Goisbeault of Médiamétrie, Guy Rolfe of Kantar, Nicole Bensky and Justin Bailey of The Nielsen Company, Dr Michael Bosnjak of Free University of Bozen-Bolzano, Karin Rothstock of Tomorrow Focus, Sean Con

Brown and Thaddeus Fulford-Jones of Locately. Sessions will be chaired by Dr Liz Nelson, Chair of the MRC Committee, and Tim Macer, Managing Director of Meaning Ltd.

Dr Nelson, Chair of the Programme Committee told us:
“It’s with great pleasure that I announce the final programme for Globalpark’s Mobile Research Conference 2011. Mobile offers us some practical and wondrous research solutions. The conference line up will discuss these and best practice without shying away from looking at the challenges.”

Market Structure
The boat dealership industry comprises traditional powerboats, personal watercrafts, kayaks and sailboats.

The U.S. pleasure boat industry has had several years of growth, with real domestic shipments growing 3 percent annually from 1992 to 1998 (see Table 39-12). Over that period, real apparent consumption also rose, growing 5 percent annually, thanks mostly to an annual growth rate of 22 percent in U.S. imports of pleasure boats. The boating industry has kept pace with the national economy, which grew 3 percent annually from 1992 to 1998 as measured by real GDP. Growth in personal income and consumer spending have been the highlights of GDP growth, and those factors are key indicators of growth for the boating industry. Real disposable personal income grew 2 percent annually from 1992 to 1998, while total real personal consumption expenditures grew 3 percent annually over that period. Real personal consumption expenditures on boats increased 15 percent annually over that period.

However, in 1999, the boating industry saw growth slow down while the national economy continued to have strong growth. In the first 6 months of 1999, GDP and disposable personal income each increased 4 percent compared with the first 6 months of 1998, while personal consumption expenditures increased 5 percent in real terms after double-digit annual growth from 1992 through 1998. In 1999, real domestic shipments increased an estimated 1 percent, totaling $6.2 billion in current dollars. Fueled by an estimated 10 percent growth in U.S. boat imports, apparent consumption increased 2.3 percent in real terms. Several indicators for the boat industry began to slow or decline. While consumers continued to spend, they began to dip into savings in 1999. Savings as a percentage of disposable income averaged -1 percent in the first half of 1999. The ratio of consumer debt to personal income also remained high, above 18 percent, for the fifth consecutive year. In addition, interest rates increased modestly throughout the first half of the year. These indicators made consumers more concerned about taking on the significant additional debt associated with the purchase of a boat. This consumer wariness can be measured to a degree by consumer expectations surveys. According to a University of Michigan survey, consumers’ expectations dipped in the first half of 1999, down 3.8 percent from 1998. Indicators such as consumer expectations were at or near record highs. It is likely that the negative growth may only slow growth in the industry rather than signaling a decline. In addition, some manufacturers are reporting a shift of consumer preferences toward larger, more expensive boats, offsetting any negative growth trends in the industry. Industry shipments were expected to increase almost 1 percent in 1999 in 1992 dollars.

A further concern of the boating industry in regard to today’s consumers is whether they continue to enjoy boating. Participation in boating and boating activities declined over the last 10 years. According to an NSGA survey, 25.7 million people participated in power and motor boating in 1998, down from 32.5 million in 1988. Participation in sailing decreased from 6.7 million to 3.6 million individuals from 1988 to 1998. Several activities associated with boating also declined, such as water skiing and fishing. Over that period, participation in water skiing dropped from 12.8 million to 7.2 million individuals. Fishing lost 2.1 million individuals from 1988 to 1998, when it had 43.6 million participants. Overdevelopment of water locations, higher participation costs versus those for other recreational activities, and a lack of a concerted effort to promote the activity are the reasons most commonly cited for the decline in participation.

Global Industry Trends

Despite the potential of international E-commerce, foreign market demand has been weak over the last several years. U.S. exports of pleasure boats fell 1 percent annually from 1992 through 1998. In 1999, U.S. exports were estimated to lose over 1 percent. Overall economic conditions in many overseas markets have not been as strong as those in the U.S. market. Real GDP growth in the top 20 overseas markets, as weighted by U.S. total manufacturing exports, increased only 2 percent in 1998 and an estimated 1.8 percent in 1999 compared with 3.9 percent and an estimated 3.5 percent for the U.S. market in 1998 and 1999, respectively. As was the case more recently in the United States, this probably meant that consumer confidence and disposable income growth were lower, making consumers slightly more apprehensive about buying a boat. In addition, it is likely that less was spent on capital investments, particularly marina development. Furthermore, overseas pleasure boat markets are smaller and therefore typically have fewer dealers and distributors that are willing to take risks when the economy is weak or unstable.

The U.S. pleasure boat market is the largest in the world. U.S. consumption of pleasure boats and marine accessories accounts for an estimated 60 percent of the worldwide market for such products. Typically, U.S. manufacturers hope for a strong U.S. market to bolster sales and profits. A strong U.S. market also helps exports to a degree, as economies of scale are an important factor in the production of boats. If U.S. manufacturers are able to produce a large number of boats for the U.S. market, prices will decline for domestic and international buyers, making the U.S. firms more price-competitive overseas.
Hey netra, great information on Renys and i would like to thank you for your research work. Well, after reading your document i thought i should also add some more information on Renys so uploading a document which would be useful.
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