Go Back   ManagementParadise.com | Management & Business Education Learning Platform PUBLISH / UPLOAD PROJECT OR DOWNLOAD REFERENCE PROJECT > Marketing Research ( MR )

Marketing Research of Always

Discuss Marketing Research of Always within the Marketing Research ( MR ) forums, part of the PUBLISH / UPLOAD PROJECT OR DOWNLOAD REFERENCE PROJECT category; ...

Reply

 

Thread Tools Display Modes
Marketing Research of Always
Old
 (1 (permalink))
Netra Shetty
netrashetty is on a distinguished road
 
netrashetty
Student of PGDM at Mats Institute of Management and Entrepreneurship
Bangalore, Karnataka
Management Paradise Guru
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 4,857
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Bangalore, Karnataka
Marketing Research of Always - March 29th, 2011

Always is a brand of feminine hygiene products, including maxi pads, pantiliners, and feminine wipes, produced by Procter & Gamble. It was released in 1983. Always is sold under the name Whisper in Japan, Singapore, India, China, South Korea, Philippines, Pakistan, Thailand and Indonesia, under the name Lines in Italy, under the name Orchid in Turkey, under the name Evax and Ausonia in Spain. Procter & Gamble has global leading position in manufacturing and commercializing feminine hygiene products.

The emergence of globalisation has made the world much a smaller place. Nations has become virtually a partition demarcating certain geographical areas of an enormous community. The business sector may well be the foremost area which is influenced by the increase in proximity among nations. Commerce has become a transnational affair. Along with these developments, the major principles of business are also taken into consideration. More importantly, the context of marketing has to undergo changes in order to fit the demands of international businesses. This paper will be taking a close look on the importance of international marketing for organisation seeking to operate in the international setting. In the same manner, the study will be covering the areas on which international marketing influences. Specifically, a look in international marketing environment, dynamics of domestic and international marketing, international marketing strategies, implications of culture differences, international market research, the operations of small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) in the international market, types of market entry, and the typically employed market communications initiatives in the international setting. The observations and arguments used in the following discussions are to be based on the journals and academic articles that deal directly with international marketing and international marketing theories.



II. International Marketing
Trading internationally is a phenomenon that dates back in the ancient civilisations when galleons and junks were the foremost modes of transportation to send out merchandise from one country to another. In recent times, international trade is driven by “market, cost, government, competition and other factors.” (Stone and McCall 2004, 3) In looking at this definition, it appears that a lot is laid on the line for every company who seeks to operate in an international level. Any wrong decision or any indiscretion that the company may undertake could spell success and failure of the international venture. Thus, the need to understand and become well acquainted with the international market is a key ingredient in every company’s pursuit to eliminate the possibility of failure. In looking at this claim, it appears that the environment holds the answer for company who seeks to enter the international market. As mentioned in the work of Rao (1998, 256) “the international environment directly affects the firm's strategic options.” This therefore reinforces the importance of knowing the minutiae of the international environment before taking on initiatives towards operating in an international level. In this regard, any company that seeks to indulge on its international operations would have to make their strategy fit every aspect of the environment. (p 256) Taking this into consideration, it appears that planning is an essential part of the process. As Stone and McCall (2004, 221) mentioned in their work, the process of international marketing involves more that the basic elements of planning. More specifically, international marketing entails “careful planning to achieve the organization's strategic goals.” (p 221)



III. The International Marketing Environment
The major driver of international trading, as indicated above, is globalisation. Studies have defined globalisation as the union and interrelationship of systems of production and distribution of cultural differences among the diverse economic systems in the world. (Connell 2004, 78) Thus, the attempt to develop the economy is the primary thrust of countries to trade with other nations to satisfy both their self-serving ends. In the same regard, the mobility of capital between the countries make trading vital for the operations of any economic system. With such capital, economies are able to acquire both economic growth and economic development. Lam and Kwok (2001, 466) defined economic growth as “the process of growth in the total and per capita income, accompanied by a fundamental change in the institutional dimensions of the economy.” This means that along with the improvements in the potential of the economic features of the state, the state seeks to improve the social conditions for the state. On the other hand, states also encourage international trading because they seek to secure capital accumulation on a consistent level. (Hayami and Godo 2005, 85) This is basically what is characterised as economic development.

It has been established that states welcome any form of trading with other countries provided that they fulfil some self-serving interests. However, like any other endeavour, it is more likely that impediments and problems are to be expected in the process. Though there has been an established legal framework that deals with free trading in the global setting, states sometimes find a way to ratify protectionist policies to look after their local industries. Such policies could include the imposition of quotas, subsidies, tariffs, and other trade restrictions. (Ruggie, 1994, 2) Other barriers could also be seen in the existing legal frameworks that a particular country employs as a part of their responsibilities as members of a regional bloc or a different trade agreement.
Recession-challenged consumers are buying less, looking for deals, or switching to different brands, product categories, or stores. Some are even changing long-held attitudes toward consumption. To many folks, filling the home with more stuff or keeping up with the Joneses is no longer appealing.

As a result, the degree of uncertainty in business and consumer markets has soared. Yet, to conserve cash, most firms are reducing spending on the market research that would help manage that uncertainty. In the United States, spending on market research has dipped for four consecutive quarters, and chief marketing officers don't expect the situation to turn around soon. Most big consumer marketers are seeking to shave 10 to 20 percent off of research budgets.

In flush times, a rising tide of consumption can compensate for less than optimal branding, positioning, pricing, or segmentation. That is certainly not the case now. At the same time that marketers must pare down research expenditures, they face added pressure to secure high-quality data and insights.

I recommend that CMOs take the following seven steps to minimize the impact of reduced spending.

Stay focused. Savvy marketers focus their research on the products, brands, and markets that are key to their marketing strategy. In a recession, it's essential to get a clear read on existing core customers, including those who are most loyal to the brand and those who are most profitable, rather than fritter away research resources on potential or peripheral consumers. When times are good, there is budget available for increased research on secondary products or customers. Now, nice-to-knows that are not essential will have to wait.


Related Articles
Use Demographics to Understand Your Target Market
Introduction to Market Research
Secrets of Successful Market-Research Studies
Sponsored Links
BrotherŽ printers rated #1 in reliability by PCMag.com readers.
Success depends on a lot of things, but when you have information about a particular market segment, a geographic area, or customer preferences, you'll be better prepared to make the decisions that can make or break your business.

Many companies use market research as a guide. Whether you want to expand your business into a new area or introduce a new product, primary and secondary market research can provide valuable insight to help you shape your business and prevent costly missteps.

Secondary Research
If you’re considering extending your business into new markets or adding new services or product lines, start with secondary research. This type of research is based on information gleaned from studies previously performed by government agencies, chambers of commerce, trade associations, and other organizations. This includes Census Bureau information and Nielsen ratings.

You can find much of this kind of information in local libraries or on the Web, but books and business publications, as well as magazines and newspapers, are also great sources.

Although secondary research is less expensive than primary research, it's not as accurate, or as useful, as specific and customized research. For instance, secondary research will tell you how much teenagers spent last year on basketball shoes, but not how much they're willing to pay for the shoe design your company has in mind.

Primary Research
Simply put, primary research is research that's tailored to a company's particular needs. By customizing tried-and-true approaches — focus groups, surveys, field tests, interviews or observation — you can gain information about your target market. For example, you can investigate an issue specific to your business, get feedback about your Web site, assess demand for a proposed service, gauge response to various packaging options, and find out how much consumers will shell out for a new product.

Primary research delivers more specific results than secondary research, which is an especially important consideration when you're launching a new product or service. In addition, primary research is usually based on statistical methodologies that involve sampling as little as 1 percent of a target market. This tiny sample can give an accurate representation of a particular market.

But professional primary research can be pricey. Tabs for focus groups can easily run from $3,000 to $6,000, and surveys cost anywhere from $5,000 to $25,000 and up. Do-it-yourself research is, of course, much cheaper. Services that provide online survey tools usually charge a flat fee (typically around $1 or more per response) plus a setup fee. There are also a host of software products available that will help you conduct your own online and offline primary research.
Advertisements

Friends: (0)
Reply With Quote
Re: Marketing Research of Always
Old
 (2 (permalink))
James Cord
jamescord is an unknown quantity at this point
 
jamescord
Management Paradise Guru
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 2,112
Join Date: Mar 2016
Re: Marketing Research of Always - March 3rd, 2016

Quote:
Originally Posted by netrashetty View Post
Always is a brand of feminine hygiene products, including maxi pads, pantiliners, and feminine wipes, produced by Procter & Gamble. It was released in 1983. Always is sold under the name Whisper in Japan, Singapore, India, China, South Korea, Philippines, Pakistan, Thailand and Indonesia, under the name Lines in Italy, under the name Orchid in Turkey, under the name Evax and Ausonia in Spain. Procter & Gamble has global leading position in manufacturing and commercializing feminine hygiene products.

The emergence of globalisation has made the world much a smaller place. Nations has become virtually a partition demarcating certain geographical areas of an enormous community. The business sector may well be the foremost area which is influenced by the increase in proximity among nations. Commerce has become a transnational affair. Along with these developments, the major principles of business are also taken into consideration. More importantly, the context of marketing has to undergo changes in order to fit the demands of international businesses. This paper will be taking a close look on the importance of international marketing for organisation seeking to operate in the international setting. In the same manner, the study will be covering the areas on which international marketing influences. Specifically, a look in international marketing environment, dynamics of domestic and international marketing, international marketing strategies, implications of culture differences, international market research, the operations of small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) in the international market, types of market entry, and the typically employed market communications initiatives in the international setting. The observations and arguments used in the following discussions are to be based on the journals and academic articles that deal directly with international marketing and international marketing theories.



II. International Marketing
Trading internationally is a phenomenon that dates back in the ancient civilisations when galleons and junks were the foremost modes of transportation to send out merchandise from one country to another. In recent times, international trade is driven by “market, cost, government, competition and other factors.” (Stone and McCall 2004, 3) In looking at this definition, it appears that a lot is laid on the line for every company who seeks to operate in an international level. Any wrong decision or any indiscretion that the company may undertake could spell success and failure of the international venture. Thus, the need to understand and become well acquainted with the international market is a key ingredient in every company’s pursuit to eliminate the possibility of failure. In looking at this claim, it appears that the environment holds the answer for company who seeks to enter the international market. As mentioned in the work of Rao (1998, 256) “the international environment directly affects the firm's strategic options.” This therefore reinforces the importance of knowing the minutiae of the international environment before taking on initiatives towards operating in an international level. In this regard, any company that seeks to indulge on its international operations would have to make their strategy fit every aspect of the environment. (p 256) Taking this into consideration, it appears that planning is an essential part of the process. As Stone and McCall (2004, 221) mentioned in their work, the process of international marketing involves more that the basic elements of planning. More specifically, international marketing entails “careful planning to achieve the organization's strategic goals.” (p 221)



III. The International Marketing Environment
The major driver of international trading, as indicated above, is globalisation. Studies have defined globalisation as the union and interrelationship of systems of production and distribution of cultural differences among the diverse economic systems in the world. (Connell 2004, 78) Thus, the attempt to develop the economy is the primary thrust of countries to trade with other nations to satisfy both their self-serving ends. In the same regard, the mobility of capital between the countries make trading vital for the operations of any economic system. With such capital, economies are able to acquire both economic growth and economic development. Lam and Kwok (2001, 466) defined economic growth as “the process of growth in the total and per capita income, accompanied by a fundamental change in the institutional dimensions of the economy.” This means that along with the improvements in the potential of the economic features of the state, the state seeks to improve the social conditions for the state. On the other hand, states also encourage international trading because they seek to secure capital accumulation on a consistent level. (Hayami and Godo 2005, 85) This is basically what is characterised as economic development.

It has been established that states welcome any form of trading with other countries provided that they fulfil some self-serving interests. However, like any other endeavour, it is more likely that impediments and problems are to be expected in the process. Though there has been an established legal framework that deals with free trading in the global setting, states sometimes find a way to ratify protectionist policies to look after their local industries. Such policies could include the imposition of quotas, subsidies, tariffs, and other trade restrictions. (Ruggie, 1994, 2) Other barriers could also be seen in the existing legal frameworks that a particular country employs as a part of their responsibilities as members of a regional bloc or a different trade agreement.
Recession-challenged consumers are buying less, looking for deals, or switching to different brands, product categories, or stores. Some are even changing long-held attitudes toward consumption. To many folks, filling the home with more stuff or keeping up with the Joneses is no longer appealing.

As a result, the degree of uncertainty in business and consumer markets has soared. Yet, to conserve cash, most firms are reducing spending on the market research that would help manage that uncertainty. In the United States, spending on market research has dipped for four consecutive quarters, and chief marketing officers don't expect the situation to turn around soon. Most big consumer marketers are seeking to shave 10 to 20 percent off of research budgets.

In flush times, a rising tide of consumption can compensate for less than optimal branding, positioning, pricing, or segmentation. That is certainly not the case now. At the same time that marketers must pare down research expenditures, they face added pressure to secure high-quality data and insights.

I recommend that CMOs take the following seven steps to minimize the impact of reduced spending.

Stay focused. Savvy marketers focus their research on the products, brands, and markets that are key to their marketing strategy. In a recession, it's essential to get a clear read on existing core customers, including those who are most loyal to the brand and those who are most profitable, rather than fritter away research resources on potential or peripheral consumers. When times are good, there is budget available for increased research on secondary products or customers. Now, nice-to-knows that are not essential will have to wait.


Related Articles
Use Demographics to Understand Your Target Market
Introduction to Market Research
Secrets of Successful Market-Research Studies
Sponsored Links
BrotherŽ printers rated #1 in reliability by PCMag.com readers.
Success depends on a lot of things, but when you have information about a particular market segment, a geographic area, or customer preferences, you'll be better prepared to make the decisions that can make or break your business.

Many companies use market research as a guide. Whether you want to expand your business into a new area or introduce a new product, primary and secondary market research can provide valuable insight to help you shape your business and prevent costly missteps.

Secondary Research
If you’re considering extending your business into new markets or adding new services or product lines, start with secondary research. This type of research is based on information gleaned from studies previously performed by government agencies, chambers of commerce, trade associations, and other organizations. This includes Census Bureau information and Nielsen ratings.

You can find much of this kind of information in local libraries or on the Web, but books and business publications, as well as magazines and newspapers, are also great sources.

Although secondary research is less expensive than primary research, it's not as accurate, or as useful, as specific and customized research. For instance, secondary research will tell you how much teenagers spent last year on basketball shoes, but not how much they're willing to pay for the shoe design your company has in mind.

Primary Research
Simply put, primary research is research that's tailored to a company's particular needs. By customizing tried-and-true approaches — focus groups, surveys, field tests, interviews or observation — you can gain information about your target market. For example, you can investigate an issue specific to your business, get feedback about your Web site, assess demand for a proposed service, gauge response to various packaging options, and find out how much consumers will shell out for a new product.

Primary research delivers more specific results than secondary research, which is an especially important consideration when you're launching a new product or service. In addition, primary research is usually based on statistical methodologies that involve sampling as little as 1 percent of a target market. This tiny sample can give an accurate representation of a particular market.

But professional primary research can be pricey. Tabs for focus groups can easily run from $3,000 to $6,000, and surveys cost anywhere from $5,000 to $25,000 and up. Do-it-yourself research is, of course, much cheaper. Services that provide online survey tools usually charge a flat fee (typically around $1 or more per response) plus a setup fee. There are also a host of software products available that will help you conduct your own online and offline primary research.
Hi dear,

please check attachment for Canadian Advertising Success Stories - 'Always' Campaign
Friends: (0)
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
advertising research, careers in marketing, consumer marketing, economic trends, environmental scanning, government regulations, international marketing, market segmentation, market structure, marketing, marketing campaigns, marketing environment, marketing mix, marketing research, mr of us company, mr on us company, pre-testing, product research, qualitative marketing, research methods, research plan, role of marketing, technological advances, types of marketing, us company
Related to Marketing Research of Always
 

Similar Threads

Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
know more on marketing research DK 2424 Marketing Management 1 November 22nd, 2017 09:48 AM
Research on marketing research for services Alok Anand Resolve Your Query - Get Help and discuss Projects 5 May 3rd, 2016 04:24 PM
RESEARCH SYSTEM IN MARKETING RESEARCH Abhijeet S Marketing Research ( MR ) 2 March 2nd, 2016 04:32 PM
Marketing Research and Marketing Information Systems hashminou HOT Debates - The Big Fight 6 May 29th, 2015 09:11 PM
Research Associate:Data Research,Market Research,Business Development, 0-5 years exp, Maya Raichura JOB OFFERS , Recruitments , Placements !! 0 June 14th, 2008 02:51 AM
 


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


ManagementParadise.com is not responsible for the views and opinion of the posters. The posters and only posters shall be liable for any copyright infringement.



Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.