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Types of Surveys

Discuss Types of Surveys within the Marketing Research ( MR ) forums, part of the PUBLISH / UPLOAD PROJECT OR DOWNLOAD REFERENCE PROJECT category; Types of Surveys Commercial Surveys Commercial surveys are conducted by research organizations and fall into three categories: periodic, panel, and ...

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Types of Surveys - September 7th, 2010

Types of Surveys

Commercial Surveys
  • Commercial surveys are conducted by research organizations and fall into three categories: periodic, panel, and shared.

  • Periodic surveys measure the same attitudes,, knowledge, and/or behaviors using different samples at regular points in time.

  • Panel surveys generally measure differing attitudes, knowledge, and/or behaviors using the same basic set of respondents at either regular or unique time intervals.

  • Finally, shared surveys are surveys that are administered by a research firm and are composed of questions submitted by multiple clients.



Periodic Surveys
  • Periodic surveys are conducted at regular intervals, ranging from weekly to annually.

  • They use a new sample of respondents (individuals, households, or stores) for each survey, focusing on the same topic and allowing the analysis of trends over time, though changes in individual respondents cannot be traced.

  • These surveys cover topics ranging from values to media usage and food preparation.
  • Periodic surveys are conducted by mail, personal interview, and telephone.

  • They are subject to all of the problems of questionnaire design, sampling, and survey method that affect custom surveys.

  • In addition, when periodic surveys are conducted at known intervals, they may affect the behavior being measured.

  • For example, periodic surveys are used to measure television viewing. Telecasters have responded by scheduling specials and particularly popular shows to coincide with these surveys



Panel Surveys
  • Panel surveys, sometimes called interval panels, are conducted among a group of respondents who have agreed to respond to a number of mails, telephone, or, occasionally, personal interviews over time.

  • The interviews may cover virtually any topic and need not occur on a regular basis.


  • In contrast, a Panel, a continuous panel or panel data refers to a group of individuals who agree to report specified behaviors over time.

  • In an interval panel, the research firm initially gathers detailed data on each respondent, including demographics and attitudinal and product-ownership items.

  • Because the researchers need not collect this basic demographic data again, they can now obtain more relevant information from each respondent.

  • These basic data also allow researchers to select very specific samples, For example, a researcher can select only those families within a panel that have one or more daughters between the ages of 12 and 16, or that own a dog, or that wear contact lens.

  • This ability to select allows a tremendous swings over a random survey procedure if a study is to be made for a product for teenage girls, dog owners, or contact lens wearers, and so on.
  • It is possible to survey the same interval panel members several times to monitor changes in their attitudes and purchase behavior in response to changes in the firm's or a competitor's marketing mix.

  • However, interval panels are used more often for cross-sectional (one-time) surveys. A major advantage is the high response rate obtained by most interval panels. Return rates in the range of 70 to 90 percent are often obtained.

  • In addition, the firm does not have to generate a sampling frame, a process that is both time consuming and costly.

  • Finally, since panel members are convinced of the legitimacy of the firm maintaining the panel, they may supply more detailed and accurate data to both neutral and sensitive questions.
  • Data are normally collected by mail, but telephone, personal, and even focus groups can be used. Clients can survey the entire panel, a stratified random sample of the larger panel, or a specific type, size, or location category.

  • Panel surveys obtain very high response rates.

  • However, the response rate when individuals are initially asked to join a panel may be quite low. Thus, panels do not eliminate nonresponse error.

  • This issue is discussed in depth in the section on continuous panels.

Shared Surveys
  • Shared surveys, sometimes referred to as omnibus surveys, are administered by a research firm and consist of questions supplied by multiple clients.

  • Such surveys can involve mail, telephone, or personal interviews.

  • The respondents may be drawn from either an interval panel or randomly from the larger population.

  • Shared surveys offer the client several advantages.

  • First, since several clients share the fixed cost of sample design and most of the variable surveying costs, the cost per question is generally quite low.
  • Since these data are collected frequently, responses can be obtained very quickly.

  • This feature is helpful for measuring consumers’ responses to competetive moves, adverse publicity and environmental changes.
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Re: Types of Surveys
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James Cord
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Re: Types of Surveys - March 2nd, 2016

Quote:
Originally Posted by abhishreshthaa View Post
Types of Surveys

Commercial Surveys
  • Commercial surveys are conducted by research organizations and fall into three categories: periodic, panel, and shared.

  • Periodic surveys measure the same attitudes,, knowledge, and/or behaviors using different samples at regular points in time.

  • Panel surveys generally measure differing attitudes, knowledge, and/or behaviors using the same basic set of respondents at either regular or unique time intervals.

  • Finally, shared surveys are surveys that are administered by a research firm and are composed of questions submitted by multiple clients.



Periodic Surveys
  • Periodic surveys are conducted at regular intervals, ranging from weekly to annually.

  • They use a new sample of respondents (individuals, households, or stores) for each survey, focusing on the same topic and allowing the analysis of trends over time, though changes in individual respondents cannot be traced.

  • These surveys cover topics ranging from values to media usage and food preparation.
  • Periodic surveys are conducted by mail, personal interview, and telephone.

  • They are subject to all of the problems of questionnaire design, sampling, and survey method that affect custom surveys.

  • In addition, when periodic surveys are conducted at known intervals, they may affect the behavior being measured.

  • For example, periodic surveys are used to measure television viewing. Telecasters have responded by scheduling specials and particularly popular shows to coincide with these surveys



Panel Surveys
  • Panel surveys, sometimes called interval panels, are conducted among a group of respondents who have agreed to respond to a number of mails, telephone, or, occasionally, personal interviews over time.

  • The interviews may cover virtually any topic and need not occur on a regular basis.


  • In contrast, a Panel, a continuous panel or panel data refers to a group of individuals who agree to report specified behaviors over time.

  • In an interval panel, the research firm initially gathers detailed data on each respondent, including demographics and attitudinal and product-ownership items.

  • Because the researchers need not collect this basic demographic data again, they can now obtain more relevant information from each respondent.

  • These basic data also allow researchers to select very specific samples, For example, a researcher can select only those families within a panel that have one or more daughters between the ages of 12 and 16, or that own a dog, or that wear contact lens.

  • This ability to select allows a tremendous swings over a random survey procedure if a study is to be made for a product for teenage girls, dog owners, or contact lens wearers, and so on.
  • It is possible to survey the same interval panel members several times to monitor changes in their attitudes and purchase behavior in response to changes in the firm's or a competitor's marketing mix.

  • However, interval panels are used more often for cross-sectional (one-time) surveys. A major advantage is the high response rate obtained by most interval panels. Return rates in the range of 70 to 90 percent are often obtained.

  • In addition, the firm does not have to generate a sampling frame, a process that is both time consuming and costly.

  • Finally, since panel members are convinced of the legitimacy of the firm maintaining the panel, they may supply more detailed and accurate data to both neutral and sensitive questions.
  • Data are normally collected by mail, but telephone, personal, and even focus groups can be used. Clients can survey the entire panel, a stratified random sample of the larger panel, or a specific type, size, or location category.

  • Panel surveys obtain very high response rates.

  • However, the response rate when individuals are initially asked to join a panel may be quite low. Thus, panels do not eliminate nonresponse error.

  • This issue is discussed in depth in the section on continuous panels.

Shared Surveys
  • Shared surveys, sometimes referred to as omnibus surveys, are administered by a research firm and consist of questions supplied by multiple clients.

  • Such surveys can involve mail, telephone, or personal interviews.

  • The respondents may be drawn from either an interval panel or randomly from the larger population.

  • Shared surveys offer the client several advantages.

  • First, since several clients share the fixed cost of sample design and most of the variable surveying costs, the cost per question is generally quite low.
  • Since these data are collected frequently, responses can be obtained very quickly.

  • This feature is helpful for measuring consumers’ responses to competetive moves, adverse publicity and environmental changes.
hey friend,

I am also uploading a document which will give more detailed explanation on the Community-Based Research on Survey Research.
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