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Organisational Structure of Midwest Communications

Discuss Organisational Structure of Midwest Communications within the Human Resources Management (H.R) forums, part of the PUBLISH / UPLOAD PROJECT OR DOWNLOAD REFERENCE PROJECT category; Midwest Communications, Inc. consists of Midwest Communications, Inc. and WRIG, Inc., which collectively own forty-six (46) radio stations. The Company ...

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Netra Shetty
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Organisational Structure of Midwest Communications - February 5th, 2011

Midwest Communications, Inc. consists of Midwest Communications, Inc. and WRIG, Inc., which collectively own forty-six (46) radio stations. The Company got its start in Wausau, Wisconsin, with WRIG, Inc. and the acquisition by the D.E. Wright family of a 1400 kHz, 250 watt AM facility from the Wisconsin Valley Television Corporation. The call letters WRIG (for Wright) were assigned and on August 1, 1958, top forty-formatted WRIG signed on the air. Power was increased to 1,000 watts in 1961 and WRIG-FM (now WDEZ) signed on in 1964. Midwest built WROE in Appleton/Oshkosh, Wisconsin in 1971. In 1975 Midwest purchased WBAY-AM and WBAY-FM, Green Bay, Wisconsin. Due to FCC rules at that time, WROE was sold. The Green Bay call letters were changed to WGEE-AM (now WTAQ-AM) and WIXX-FM. The 1980’s saw the acquisition by Midwest of KIOA & KMGK, Des Moines, Iowa, WKKQ(now WNMT) & WTBX, Hibbing, Minnesota and KLMS & KFMQ, Lincoln, Nebraska. In addition WRIG moved to 1390 kHz and increased power to 5000 watts day and night.
The 1990’s brought radical changes in FCC ownership rules, and Midwest took advantage of the changes by consolidating in the Green Bay-Appleton/Oshkosh and Wausau-Stevens Point markets. The consolidation brought about the sale of the Des Moines, Lincoln and Hibbing stations and the acquisitions of WROE, WOZZ, WLTM (now WRQE), WNCY and WNFL in Green Bay-Appleton/Oshkosh and WSAU, WIFC, WOFM and WIZD in Wausau-Stevens Point. In addition four stations WTVB, WNWN-AM, WNWN-FM and WFAT were acquired in the Kalamazoo-Battle Creek, Michigan market.


CEO

Roberto Herencia
Chairman of the Board

Percy Berger
Director

Barry Forrester
Director

Robert Genetski
Director

E. Silveri
Director

Monsignor Velo
Director

Gerald Hartley

Northwest Area

John Eilering
CFO

JoAnn Lilek
Chief Credit Officer

TC
Risk Management

SE
Planning & Development

AP
Midwest Bank

SB
Midwest Bank

DM
Midwest Bank

SM
Midwest Bank

JG
Executive Vice President

TH
Operations & Technology

BC
Commercial & Industrial Lend...

DB

Wealth Management

David Taylor
Senior Executive Vice Presid...

JF
Human Resource

MC
Accounting

JT
Investor Relations

JP

Multinationals-and other large firms, for that matter-generally are divided into several parts, units, or divisions that reflect some aspect of their strategy. This link between structure and strategy was made famous in the classic book Strategy and Structure by Alfred DuPont Chandler. For example, a firm with five product categories may have been structured into five divisions, each division mandated to manage one of the product categories. Chris Bartlett and Sumantra Ghoshal build on this logic as they focus on organizational responses to global and local forces; and they describe four organizational types (or mentalities) for the global organization that represent organizational and strategic responses to various industry contingencies. For example, they describe the global firm that views the world as its market, assumes that national tastes are more similar than different, and that believes in standardized products; and these strategic approaches require structural integrative mechanisms that are to coordinate worldwide activities, production, marketing, research and development (R&D), and planning.

Thus, it is these structural processes that are implied by the term global structure. Mechanisms All large organizations need some structures that coordinate and integrate to some degree. However, the global strategy relies on these structures for implementation There are three major aspects to this kind of structure. The first is the locus of strategic responsibility. Second, the way the structure separates reporting relationships and dictates how the firm is divided. This aspect of structure may be called structuring. The final aspect is the kinds of coordination and integration systems-these may be called processes.

Locus of strategic responsibility: A crucial aspect of organization structure is the extent to which decision- making autonomy is delegated from corporate headquarters to parts of the business. In the global firm there is a strategic imperative to centralize important strategic decisions. For example, decisions on product range, research and development, branding, and human resource management tend to be made at corporate rather than subsidiary level. Even customer service, which is the function most likely to be located closer to the customer, may have its major policies and standards set at corporate level. Structuring: A characteristic of the global structure is that it is relatively blind to geographic distance and instead focuses on one or more other strategic dimensions-like products or markets-that it considers more important (than geography) to its success at implementing a global strategy.
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James Cord
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Re: Organisational Structure of Midwest Communications - April 2nd, 2016

Quote:
Originally Posted by netrashetty View Post
Midwest Communications, Inc. consists of Midwest Communications, Inc. and WRIG, Inc., which collectively own forty-six (46) radio stations. The Company got its start in Wausau, Wisconsin, with WRIG, Inc. and the acquisition by the D.E. Wright family of a 1400 kHz, 250 watt AM facility from the Wisconsin Valley Television Corporation. The call letters WRIG (for Wright) were assigned and on August 1, 1958, top forty-formatted WRIG signed on the air. Power was increased to 1,000 watts in 1961 and WRIG-FM (now WDEZ) signed on in 1964. Midwest built WROE in Appleton/Oshkosh, Wisconsin in 1971. In 1975 Midwest purchased WBAY-AM and WBAY-FM, Green Bay, Wisconsin. Due to FCC rules at that time, WROE was sold. The Green Bay call letters were changed to WGEE-AM (now WTAQ-AM) and WIXX-FM. The 1980ís saw the acquisition by Midwest of KIOA & KMGK, Des Moines, Iowa, WKKQ(now WNMT) & WTBX, Hibbing, Minnesota and KLMS & KFMQ, Lincoln, Nebraska. In addition WRIG moved to 1390 kHz and increased power to 5000 watts day and night.
The 1990ís brought radical changes in FCC ownership rules, and Midwest took advantage of the changes by consolidating in the Green Bay-Appleton/Oshkosh and Wausau-Stevens Point markets. The consolidation brought about the sale of the Des Moines, Lincoln and Hibbing stations and the acquisitions of WROE, WOZZ, WLTM (now WRQE), WNCY and WNFL in Green Bay-Appleton/Oshkosh and WSAU, WIFC, WOFM and WIZD in Wausau-Stevens Point. In addition four stations WTVB, WNWN-AM, WNWN-FM and WFAT were acquired in the Kalamazoo-Battle Creek, Michigan market.


CEO

Roberto Herencia
Chairman of the Board

Percy Berger
Director

Barry Forrester
Director

Robert Genetski
Director

E. Silveri
Director

Monsignor Velo
Director

Gerald Hartley

Northwest Area

John Eilering
CFO

JoAnn Lilek
Chief Credit Officer

TC
Risk Management

SE
Planning & Development

AP
Midwest Bank

SB
Midwest Bank

DM
Midwest Bank

SM
Midwest Bank

JG
Executive Vice President

TH
Operations & Technology

BC
Commercial & Industrial Lend...

DB

Wealth Management

David Taylor
Senior Executive Vice Presid...

JF
Human Resource

MC
Accounting

JT
Investor Relations

JP

Multinationals-and other large firms, for that matter-generally are divided into several parts, units, or divisions that reflect some aspect of their strategy. This link between structure and strategy was made famous in the classic book Strategy and Structure by Alfred DuPont Chandler. For example, a firm with five product categories may have been structured into five divisions, each division mandated to manage one of the product categories. Chris Bartlett and Sumantra Ghoshal build on this logic as they focus on organizational responses to global and local forces; and they describe four organizational types (or mentalities) for the global organization that represent organizational and strategic responses to various industry contingencies. For example, they describe the global firm that views the world as its market, assumes that national tastes are more similar than different, and that believes in standardized products; and these strategic approaches require structural integrative mechanisms that are to coordinate worldwide activities, production, marketing, research and development (R&D), and planning.

Thus, it is these structural processes that are implied by the term global structure. Mechanisms All large organizations need some structures that coordinate and integrate to some degree. However, the global strategy relies on these structures for implementation There are three major aspects to this kind of structure. The first is the locus of strategic responsibility. Second, the way the structure separates reporting relationships and dictates how the firm is divided. This aspect of structure may be called structuring. The final aspect is the kinds of coordination and integration systems-these may be called processes.

Locus of strategic responsibility: A crucial aspect of organization structure is the extent to which decision- making autonomy is delegated from corporate headquarters to parts of the business. In the global firm there is a strategic imperative to centralize important strategic decisions. For example, decisions on product range, research and development, branding, and human resource management tend to be made at corporate rather than subsidiary level. Even customer service, which is the function most likely to be located closer to the customer, may have its major policies and standards set at corporate level. Structuring: A characteristic of the global structure is that it is relatively blind to geographic distance and instead focuses on one or more other strategic dimensions-like products or markets-that it considers more important (than geography) to its success at implementing a global strategy.
Hey there,

Here i am up-loading Organizational Restructuring of Midwest Communications and WRIG, Inc, please check attachment below.
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Ideal Hr
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Re: Organisational Structure of Midwest Communications - February 13th, 2017

The information is really helpful. Thanks for the post!!
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