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Organisational Structure of Devon Energy

Discuss Organisational Structure of Devon Energy within the Human Resources Management (H.R) forums, part of the PUBLISH / UPLOAD PROJECT OR DOWNLOAD REFERENCE PROJECT category; Devon Energy Corporation (NYSE: DVN), is among the largest U.S.-based independent natural gas and oil producers. Based in Oklahoma City, ...

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Netra Shetty
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Organisational Structure of Devon Energy - February 4th, 2011

Devon Energy Corporation (NYSE: DVN), is among the largest U.S.-based independent natural gas and oil producers. Based in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, the company's operations are focused on North American onshore exploration and production. Devon is one of North America’s larger processors of natural gas liquids and owns natural gas pipelines and treatment facilities in many of the company’s producing areas.
The company is ranked among Fortune's 500 largest corporations in America, and is also included on the publication's 100 Best Companies to Work For and Most Admired Companies lists. Devon is also included in the S&P 500 Index and trades on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker symbol DVN.


CEO

John Richels

Chairman of the Board

Larry Nichols

Director

Todd Mitchell

Director

Mary Ricciardello

Director

Michael Kanovsky

Director

Duane Radtke

Director

Robert Mosbacher

Director

Robert Henry

Director

John Hill
CFO

Jeff Agosta

Marketing & Midstream

Darryl Smette
Administration

AM
Canada

CS
Central Division

BF

Legal

Lyndon Taylor
Human Resource

FR
Marketing & Midstream Divisi...

TR
Public Affairs

WW
Southern Division

GK
Strategic Planning

ER
Western Division

DD
Governance & Secretary

CB

Exploration & Production

David Hager


Another determinant of structure is comprised of the beliefs and values of the people forming the organization. Many firms in the computer industry, formed by young entrepreneurs who favor informal life-styles, have loose, informal, and collegial structures that reflect those values. Alfred P. Sloan put his personal stamp on the organization of General Motors in the 1920s, and it was not until the turbulent days of the 1970s that significant changes were made. Interestingly, these changes were brought about primarily as a response to the environment.

Environmental constraints include legislation, government regulation, court orders, market characteristics, social issues, and societal norms. For example, major incursions by Japanese auto manufacturers into the U.S. market have forced American firms to change their production methods as well as the underlying structures of their organizations. Laws concerning entry into or exclusion from certain businesses, the imposition or removal of regulations, and such court-ordered actions as the breakup of American Telephone and Telegraph Company affect the structure of organizations. The birth of People Express and other air carriers was the direct result of the Airline Deregulations Act of 1978, which enabled new carriers to enter the airline business for the first time in decades.

Technology is another determining factor that will affect the new forms organizations will take. One example concerns organizations that were once a part of AT&T. Rapidly changing telecommunications technology and the removal of certain regulations are opening new market niches in which the regional telephone companies can compete. Another example is robotics and other modern production methods. As these technologies have developed, they have changed the American automobile industry as significantly as did foreign competition. Some research demonstrates that technological change offers occasions for restructuring.

Technology has received an extensive amount of study over the years. The research has produced the following typology of technology:

- Long-linked technology, in which many operations are interdependent, such as an assembly line
- Mediating technology, in which otherwise independent units are linked by following procedures, such as bank tellers who all serve customers in an isolated way but do so according to the bank's rules
- Intensive technology, in which the task sequence is unique and depends on feedback from the object being acted upon. Hospitals exhibit this technology in that patients are acted upon differentially and each action depends on their response (improvement or deterioration of their condition) to prior actions.

As organizations move from one type of technology to another, the demand for rigid rules or flexibility changes. While cooperation is significant in all three technologies-later stages of an assembly line cannot function smoothly if earlier stages falter, just as the surgical team requires intense cooperation to succeed-more flexibility and communication is needed in intensive technology than in the other two forms.
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Re: Organisational Structure of Devon Energy
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James Cord
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Re: Organisational Structure of Devon Energy - April 2nd, 2016

Quote:
Originally Posted by netrashetty View Post
Devon Energy Corporation (NYSE: DVN), is among the largest U.S.-based independent natural gas and oil producers. Based in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, the company's operations are focused on North American onshore exploration and production. Devon is one of North America’s larger processors of natural gas liquids and owns natural gas pipelines and treatment facilities in many of the company’s producing areas.
The company is ranked among Fortune's 500 largest corporations in America, and is also included on the publication's 100 Best Companies to Work For and Most Admired Companies lists. Devon is also included in the S&P 500 Index and trades on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker symbol DVN.


CEO

John Richels

Chairman of the Board

Larry Nichols

Director

Todd Mitchell

Director

Mary Ricciardello

Director

Michael Kanovsky

Director

Duane Radtke

Director

Robert Mosbacher

Director

Robert Henry

Director

John Hill
CFO

Jeff Agosta

Marketing & Midstream

Darryl Smette
Administration

AM
Canada

CS
Central Division

BF

Legal

Lyndon Taylor
Human Resource

FR
Marketing & Midstream Divisi...

TR
Public Affairs

WW
Southern Division

GK
Strategic Planning

ER
Western Division

DD
Governance & Secretary

CB

Exploration & Production

David Hager


Another determinant of structure is comprised of the beliefs and values of the people forming the organization. Many firms in the computer industry, formed by young entrepreneurs who favor informal life-styles, have loose, informal, and collegial structures that reflect those values. Alfred P. Sloan put his personal stamp on the organization of General Motors in the 1920s, and it was not until the turbulent days of the 1970s that significant changes were made. Interestingly, these changes were brought about primarily as a response to the environment.

Environmental constraints include legislation, government regulation, court orders, market characteristics, social issues, and societal norms. For example, major incursions by Japanese auto manufacturers into the U.S. market have forced American firms to change their production methods as well as the underlying structures of their organizations. Laws concerning entry into or exclusion from certain businesses, the imposition or removal of regulations, and such court-ordered actions as the breakup of American Telephone and Telegraph Company affect the structure of organizations. The birth of People Express and other air carriers was the direct result of the Airline Deregulations Act of 1978, which enabled new carriers to enter the airline business for the first time in decades.

Technology is another determining factor that will affect the new forms organizations will take. One example concerns organizations that were once a part of AT&T. Rapidly changing telecommunications technology and the removal of certain regulations are opening new market niches in which the regional telephone companies can compete. Another example is robotics and other modern production methods. As these technologies have developed, they have changed the American automobile industry as significantly as did foreign competition. Some research demonstrates that technological change offers occasions for restructuring.

Technology has received an extensive amount of study over the years. The research has produced the following typology of technology:

- Long-linked technology, in which many operations are interdependent, such as an assembly line
- Mediating technology, in which otherwise independent units are linked by following procedures, such as bank tellers who all serve customers in an isolated way but do so according to the bank's rules
- Intensive technology, in which the task sequence is unique and depends on feedback from the object being acted upon. Hospitals exhibit this technology in that patients are acted upon differentially and each action depends on their response (improvement or deterioration of their condition) to prior actions.

As organizations move from one type of technology to another, the demand for rigid rules or flexibility changes. While cooperation is significant in all three technologies-later stages of an assembly line cannot function smoothly if earlier stages falter, just as the surgical team requires intense cooperation to succeed-more flexibility and communication is needed in intensive technology than in the other two forms.
Hey friend,

Please check attachment for Organisational Chart of Devon Energy Corporation, so please download and check it.
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