Go Back   ManagementParadise.com | Management & Business Education Learning Platform PUBLISH / UPLOAD PROJECT OR DOWNLOAD REFERENCE PROJECT > Human Resources Management (H.R)

Organisational Structure of Bio-Rad Laboratories

Discuss Organisational Structure of Bio-Rad Laboratories within the Human Resources Management (H.R) forums, part of the PUBLISH / UPLOAD PROJECT OR DOWNLOAD REFERENCE PROJECT category; Organisational Structure of Bio-Rad Laboratories : Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc. (NYSE: BIO and BIOb), was founded in 1952 in Berkeley, California. ...

Reply

 

Thread Tools Display Modes
Organisational Structure of Bio-Rad Laboratories
Old
 (1 (permalink))
Netra Shetty
netrashetty is on a distinguished road
 
netrashetty
Student of PGDM at Mats Institute of Management and Entrepreneurship
Bangalore, Karnataka
Management Paradise Guru
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 4,857
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Bangalore, Karnataka
Organisational Structure of Bio-Rad Laboratories - February 2nd, 2011

Organisational Structure of Bio-Rad Laboratories : Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc. (NYSE: BIO and BIOb), was founded in 1952 in Berkeley, California. The company was initially engaged in the development and production of specialty chemicals used in biochemical, pharmaceutical, and other life science research applications. Today, Bio-Rad manufactures and supplies life science research, healthcare, analytical chemistry, and other markets with products and systems used to separate complex chemical and biological materials and to identify, analyze, and purify their components[1].

Bio-Rad operates in two industry segments: Life Science Research and Clinical Diagnostics. Both segments operate worldwide. Bio-Rad’s customers include hospitals, universities, major research institutions, and biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies. Bio-Rad’s headquarters are in Hercules, California. The company has offices and facilities worldwide and more than 6,500 employees. Bio-Rad had revenues of more than $1.7 billion in 2008. The company has been listed on the New York Stock Exchange since October 24, 2008. Before that, Bio-Rad was listed on the American Stock Exchange.

CEO
Norman Schwartz
12
Chairman of the Board
David Schwartz
4
Director
Louis Drapeau
Director
Alice Schwartz
3
Director
James Bennett
5
Director
Ted Love
Director
Albert Hillman
CFO
Christine Tsingos
Control
JS
Legal & Secretary
SW
2
Clinical Diagnostics Group
John Goetz
Life Science Group
BC
International Sales
GM
Treasurer
RH

These dysfunctional organizations end up trying to go in two opposing directions at once. We once halted an executive retreat and everybody went home after the group of seven division presidents and corporate staff vice presidents couldn't agree on whether their values were centralization or decentralization. Trying to do both at once was ripping the organization apart. The CEO never could decide which direction he wanted to commit to. He was eventually fired as frustrations and infighting rose while organization performance fell.

Most centralists don't set out to deceive anybody. In their heads they know that high degrees of involvement, participation, and autonomy are key elements in high organization performance. But in their hearts, they still crave orderliness, predictability, and control. That's one of the reasons strategic planning causes so many performance shortfalls in their organizations. It's part of their futile search for a master plan that can regulate and bring a sense of order to our haphazard, unpredictable, and rapidly changing world.

Our narrow accounting systems give centralists plenty of reinforcement. For example, hard financial measures can clearly show that consolidating and centralizing support services and functions saves money and increases efficiency — at least on paper. What doesn't show up is the alienation, helplessness, and lack of connections to customers or organizational purpose that centralized bureaucracy often brings. The energy-sapping and passion-destroying effects of efficiencies may save hundreds of thousands of dollars. But traditional accounting systems can't show the hundreds of millions of dollars lost because of lackluster innovation, mediocre customer service, uninspired internal partners, and unformed external partnerships.

Pointed In The Wrong Direction

Transforming a traditional organization to one that's better, faster, cheaper, and newer is extremely difficult. That's because organizations have built powerful cultures, systems, and practices that are now pointed in the wrong direction. This misdirection can be found across three key areas:

* Internally-Focused -- most decisions about products, services, and organization direction are inside out. Product and service development specialists, technical experts, managers, planners, and other professionals spend most of their time inside the organization pushing products and services out to the market.

Too often the needs of the organization are put ahead of those people it's trying to "serve". As John McDonnell, Chairman and CEO of McDonnell Douglas put it, "we did not always listen to what the customer had to say before telling him what he wanted". This we-know-best approach is now finding many long time leaders out of sync with their markets. The ratings (and revenues) of many mighty corporations are plummeting. Their "loyal" (once treated as captive) customers find products and services that better reflect their changing perceptions of value.

* Functionally Managed -- individual departments work to optimize their own internal efficiency. Goals, objectives, measurements, and career paths move up and down within the narrow, functional "chimney walls". Functional managers and their employees focus on doing their own jobs or segment of the production, delivery, or support process.

Functionally managed organizations typically reduce service/quality levels while increasing cycle times and costs by; 1) fostering an "us-versus-them" approach to communications and fighting for organizational resources, 2) leaving unmanaged gaps between departments which disrupt cross-functional work processes, 3) making improvements or changes in one department which hurts the effectiveness of other departments in the process, and, 4) losing sight of customer-supplier relationships and meeting everyone's needs.

Since the 1950s, Toyota has worked tirelessly to reduce the walls and gaps between department. By the 1970s, their manufacturing methods became widely known throughout Japan as the "Toyota Production Methods". In the early 1980s, their highly successful practices migrated to North America as Just-In-Time manufacturing. Stressing the importance of managing across organizational boundaries, a Toyota executive said, "It is not enough to manage the affairs within your own division. One of the most important functions of a division manager is to improve coordination between his own division and other divisions. It you cannot handle this task, please go work for an American company".
Advertisements


Last edited by bhautik.kawa; July 20th, 2016 at 12:32 PM..
   
Friends: (0)
Reply With Quote
Re: Organisational Structure of Bio-Rad Laboratories
Old
 (2 (permalink))
James Cord
jamescord is an unknown quantity at this point
 
jamescord
Management Paradise Guru
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 2,112
Join Date: Mar 2016
Re: Organisational Structure of Bio-Rad Laboratories - April 2nd, 2016

Quote:
Originally Posted by netrashetty View Post
Bio-Rad Laboratories, Inc. (NYSE: BIO and BIOb), was founded in 1952 in Berkeley, California. The company was initially engaged in the development and production of specialty chemicals used in biochemical, pharmaceutical, and other life science research applications. Today, Bio-Rad manufactures and supplies life science research, healthcare, analytical chemistry, and other markets with products and systems used to separate complex chemical and biological materials and to identify, analyze, and purify their components[1].

Bio-Rad operates in two industry segments: Life Science Research and Clinical Diagnostics. Both segments operate worldwide. Bio-Radís customers include hospitals, universities, major research institutions, and biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies. Bio-Radís headquarters are in Hercules, California. The company has offices and facilities worldwide and more than 6,500 employees. Bio-Rad had revenues of more than $1.7 billion in 2008. The company has been listed on the New York Stock Exchange since October 24, 2008. Before that, Bio-Rad was listed on the American Stock Exchange.

CEO
Norman Schwartz
12
Chairman of the Board
David Schwartz
4
Director
Louis Drapeau
Director
Alice Schwartz
3
Director
James Bennett
5
Director
Ted Love
Director
Albert Hillman
CFO
Christine Tsingos
Control
JS
Legal & Secretary
SW
2
Clinical Diagnostics Group
John Goetz
Life Science Group
BC
International Sales
GM
Treasurer
RH

These dysfunctional organizations end up trying to go in two opposing directions at once. We once halted an executive retreat and everybody went home after the group of seven division presidents and corporate staff vice presidents couldn't agree on whether their values were centralization or decentralization. Trying to do both at once was ripping the organization apart. The CEO never could decide which direction he wanted to commit to. He was eventually fired as frustrations and infighting rose while organization performance fell.

Most centralists don't set out to deceive anybody. In their heads they know that high degrees of involvement, participation, and autonomy are key elements in high organization performance. But in their hearts, they still crave orderliness, predictability, and control. That's one of the reasons strategic planning causes so many performance shortfalls in their organizations. It's part of their futile search for a master plan that can regulate and bring a sense of order to our haphazard, unpredictable, and rapidly changing world.

Our narrow accounting systems give centralists plenty of reinforcement. For example, hard financial measures can clearly show that consolidating and centralizing support services and functions saves money and increases efficiency ó at least on paper. What doesn't show up is the alienation, helplessness, and lack of connections to customers or organizational purpose that centralized bureaucracy often brings. The energy-sapping and passion-destroying effects of efficiencies may save hundreds of thousands of dollars. But traditional accounting systems can't show the hundreds of millions of dollars lost because of lackluster innovation, mediocre customer service, uninspired internal partners, and unformed external partnerships.

Pointed In The Wrong Direction

Transforming a traditional organization to one that's better, faster, cheaper, and newer is extremely difficult. That's because organizations have built powerful cultures, systems, and practices that are now pointed in the wrong direction. This misdirection can be found across three key areas:

* Internally-Focused -- most decisions about products, services, and organization direction are inside out. Product and service development specialists, technical experts, managers, planners, and other professionals spend most of their time inside the organization pushing products and services out to the market.

Too often the needs of the organization are put ahead of those people it's trying to "serve". As John McDonnell, Chairman and CEO of McDonnell Douglas put it, "we did not always listen to what the customer had to say before telling him what he wanted". This we-know-best approach is now finding many long time leaders out of sync with their markets. The ratings (and revenues) of many mighty corporations are plummeting. Their "loyal" (once treated as captive) customers find products and services that better reflect their changing perceptions of value.

* Functionally Managed -- individual departments work to optimize their own internal efficiency. Goals, objectives, measurements, and career paths move up and down within the narrow, functional "chimney walls". Functional managers and their employees focus on doing their own jobs or segment of the production, delivery, or support process.

Functionally managed organizations typically reduce service/quality levels while increasing cycle times and costs by; 1) fostering an "us-versus-them" approach to communications and fighting for organizational resources, 2) leaving unmanaged gaps between departments which disrupt cross-functional work processes, 3) making improvements or changes in one department which hurts the effectiveness of other departments in the process, and, 4) losing sight of customer-supplier relationships and meeting everyone's needs.

Since the 1950s, Toyota has worked tirelessly to reduce the walls and gaps between department. By the 1970s, their manufacturing methods became widely known throughout Japan as the "Toyota Production Methods". In the early 1980s, their highly successful practices migrated to North America as Just-In-Time manufacturing. Stressing the importance of managing across organizational boundaries, a Toyota executive said, "It is not enough to manage the affairs within your own division. One of the most important functions of a division manager is to improve coordination between his own division and other divisions. It you cannot handle this task, please go work for an American company".
Hey netra,

I am also uploading a document which will give more detailed explanation on Organisational Chart of Biomet Ltd.
Attached Files
File Type: docx Organisational Chart of Biomet Ltd.docx (19.0 KB, 0 views)
Friends: (0)
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
area of hrm, career development, career management, career path, career planning, company in us, ethics in hr, hr policies, hrm of us company, hrm practices, human resource management, induction process, job evaluation, job rotation, organisational structure, organization development, organizational culture, orientation process, performance appraisal, personnel management, recruitment process, staffing process, strategic hrm, structure of us company, training development
Related to Organisational Structure of Bio-Rad Laboratories
 

Similar Threads

Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Organisational Structure of ACN Inc. Abhijeet S Human Resources Management (H.R) 1 March 31st, 2016 11:53 AM
Organisational Structure of ABX Air Netra Shetty Human Resources Management (H.R) 1 March 31st, 2016 11:50 AM
organisational structure and hrm Sagar Dhadve Principles of Management / Perspective Management 48 February 18th, 2016 01:47 PM
Organisational Structure of Abbott Laboratories Netra Shetty Human Resources Management (H.R) 1 June 9th, 2015 06:46 PM
Organisational Structure of Always Netra Shetty Human Resources Management (H.R) 0 February 1st, 2011 02:26 PM
 


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


ManagementParadise.com is not responsible for the views and opinion of the posters. The posters and only posters shall be liable for any copyright infringement.



Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.