Go Back   ManagementParadise.com | Management & Business Education Learning Platform PUBLISH / UPLOAD PROJECT OR DOWNLOAD REFERENCE PROJECT > Human Resources Management (H.R)

Organisational Structure of AOL

Discuss Organisational Structure of AOL within the Human Resources Management (H.R) forums, part of the PUBLISH / UPLOAD PROJECT OR DOWNLOAD REFERENCE PROJECT category; AOL Inc. (NYSE: AOL, stylized as "Aol.", and formerly known as America Online) is an American global Internet services and ...

Reply

 

Thread Tools Display Modes
Organisational Structure of AOL
Old
 (1 (permalink))
Netra Shetty
netrashetty is on a distinguished road
 
netrashetty
Student of PGDM at Mats Institute of Management and Entrepreneurship
Bangalore, Karnataka
Management Paradise Guru
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 4,857
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Bangalore, Karnataka
Organisational Structure of AOL - February 1st, 2011

AOL Inc. (NYSE: AOL, stylized as "Aol.", and formerly known as America Online) is an American global Internet services and media company.[4][5] AOL is headquartered at 770 Broadway in New York.[6][7] Founded in 1983 as Control Video Corporation, it has franchised its services to companies in several nations around the world or set up international versions of its services.[8]

AOL is best known for its online software suite, also called AOL, that allowed customers to access the world's largest "walled garden" online community and eventually reach out to the Internet as a whole. At its zenith, AOL's membership was over 30 million members worldwide,[9] most of whom accessed the AOL service through the AOL software suite.

On May 28, 2009, Time Warner announced that it would spin off AOL into a separate public company. The spinoff occurred on December 9, 2009,[10] ending the 8 year relationship between the two companies.


CEO
Tim Amstrong
4
Director
Fredric Reynolds
2
Director
James Stengel
Director
James Wiatt
6
Director
Michael Powell
2
Director
Patricia Mitchell
3
Director
Karen Dykstra
2
Director
William Hambrecht
2
Director
Susan Lyne
Director
Richard Dalzell
CFO
Arthur Minson
Office of the President
Maureen Sullivan
Human Resources
Kathy Andreasen
Technology
Ted Cahall
CTO
Alexander Gounares
Communication
Tricia Wallace
Paid Services
Ned Brody
Ventures, Local & Mapping
Jon Brod
2
AOL Media & Studios
David Eun
Consumer Applications
Brad Garlinghouse
Advertising & Strategy
Jeff Levick
Senior Product Manager
Farhan Memon
Business Development
Jared Grusd
Ethics & Compliance
Kimberly Strong
Diversity & Inclusion
Tiane Gordon
Mobile
Temkin David
Legal
Ira Parker
Investor Relations
Eoin Ryan

The primary function of the food and beverage department is to provide
food and drink to a hotel’s guests. In earlier times, when an inn
had a single dining room that could hold a limited number of guests,
this was a fairly simple task. Today, however, providing food and drink
is much more complicated. A large hotel might well have a coffee shop,
a gourmet restaurant, a poolside snack bar, room service, two banquet
halls, and ten function rooms where food and beverages are served. It
might also have a lounge, a nightclub, and a lobby bar. On a busy day
(or night), it’s quite likely that functions will be booked in many outlets
at the same time. In addition, some outlets may have multiple events
scheduled for a single day. As you can see, there is great diversity in the
types of activities performed by a food and beverage department, requiring
a significant variety of skills on the part of its workers.
FOOD AND BEVERAGE
DEPARTMENT
34 Chapter 2 Organizational Structure
Because of the diversity of services provided, the food and beverage
department is typically split into subunits. The executive chef, a
person of considerable importance and authority in any full-service hotel,
runs the food production, or kitchen, department. A variety of culinary
specialists who are responsible for different aspects of food preparation
report to the executive chef.
The actual serving of food in a large hotel’s restaurants is usually
the responsibility of a separate department, headed by the assistant
food and beverage director. The food service department is composed
of the individual restaurant and outlet managers, maitre d’s, waiters,
waitresses, and bus help.
Because of their special duties and concerns, many large hotels
have a separate subunit that is responsible only for room service. Because
of the high value and profit margins associated with the sale of
alcoholic beverages, some hotels have a separate department that assumes
responsibility for all outlets where alcoholic beverages are sold.
The person responsible for this department is the beverage manager.
Most full-service hotels also do a considerable convention and
catering business. The typical convention uses small function rooms
for meetings and larger rooms for general sessions, trade shows, exhibits,
and banquets. As a hotel or lodging business increases the use
of its facilities for conventions and meetings, it may form a separate
convention services department. The convention services department
and its personnel are introduced to the client, a meeting planner, or
an association executive by the marketing and sales department. The
convention services department then handles all of the client’s meeting
and catering requirements. Individually catered events include parties,
wedding receptions, business meetings, and other functions held
by groups. To provide for the unique needs of these types of customers,
hotels often organize separate catering and convention departments.
Depending on the size of the hotel, the job of cleaning the food
and beverage outlets themselves as well as of washing pots and pans,
dishes, glasses, and utensils is often delegated to a subunit known as
the stewarding department.
It is only through continuous cooperation and coordination that a
hotel’s food service function can be carried out effectively. A guest who
is dining in a hotel restaurant requires the joint efforts of the kitchen,
food service, beverage, and stewarding departments. A convention banquet
cannot be held without the efforts of the convention and catering
department along with the food production, beverage, and stewarding
departments. The sequence of events and cooperation required
among the food and beverage staff is even more important than in the
rooms department, thus increasing the importance of communication
The Organization of a Lodging Establishment 35
between managers and employees alike. Another challenge faced by
management is the diversity of the employees in the food and beverage
department; the dishwasher in the stewarding department is at a
dramatically different level than the sous chef in the kitchen.
Coordination is not as important an issue in the marketing and sales department,
which is generally much smaller than the food and beverage
department. The primary responsibility of the sales managers who make
up the marketing and sales department is sales, or the selling of the hotel
facilities and services to individuals and groups. Sales managers sell
rooms, food, and beverages to potential clients through advertising, attendance
at association and conference meetings, and direct contacts.
The marketing and sales department is also removed from most of the
day-to-day operational problems faced by other departments. The division
of work among the sales managers is based on the type of customers
a hotel is attempting to attract. Individual sales managers often specialize
in corporate accounts, conventions, or tour and travel markets. Sales
managers’ accounts are sometimes subdivided along geographical lines
into regional or national accounts. The sales staff of the largest full-service
hotels usually does not exceed a dozen or so. These sales managers
work more or less independently in their particular market segments.
The human resources department serves no customers, books no business,
and prepares no meals, yet it plays a vital role in a hotel’s efficient
operation. As shown in Figure 2–1b, the three functions of the
human resources department are employee recruitment, benefits administration,
and training. The director of human resources is also expected
to be an expert on federal and state labor laws and to advise
managers in other departments on these topics. The human resources
department’s major challenge is in its interactions with other hotel departments.
Although the human resources department recruits, interviews,
and screens prospective employees, the final hiring decision rests
within the department in which the potential employee will be working.
The same is true of promotion and disciplinary decisions; the human
resources department’s input is, in most cases, limited to advice
and interpretation of legal questions. The human resources department’s
effectiveness depends on its manager’s ability to form effective
working relationships with managers of other departments.
Advertisements


Last edited by netrashetty; February 1st, 2011 at 06:43 PM..
   
Friends: (0)
Reply With Quote
Re: Organisational Structure of AOL
Old
 (2 (permalink))
James Cord
jamescord is an unknown quantity at this point
 
jamescord
Management Paradise Guru
 
Status: Offline
Posts: 2,112
Join Date: Mar 2016
Re: Organisational Structure of AOL - April 2nd, 2016

Quote:
Originally Posted by netrashetty View Post
AOL Inc. (NYSE: AOL, stylized as "Aol.", and formerly known as America Online) is an American global Internet services and media company.[4][5] AOL is headquartered at 770 Broadway in New York.[6][7] Founded in 1983 as Control Video Corporation, it has franchised its services to companies in several nations around the world or set up international versions of its services.[8]

AOL is best known for its online software suite, also called AOL, that allowed customers to access the world's largest "walled garden" online community and eventually reach out to the Internet as a whole. At its zenith, AOL's membership was over 30 million members worldwide,[9] most of whom accessed the AOL service through the AOL software suite.

On May 28, 2009, Time Warner announced that it would spin off AOL into a separate public company. The spinoff occurred on December 9, 2009,[10] ending the 8 year relationship between the two companies.


CEO
Tim Amstrong
4
Director
Fredric Reynolds
2
Director
James Stengel
Director
James Wiatt
6
Director
Michael Powell
2
Director
Patricia Mitchell
3
Director
Karen Dykstra
2
Director
William Hambrecht
2
Director
Susan Lyne
Director
Richard Dalzell
CFO
Arthur Minson
Office of the President
Maureen Sullivan
Human Resources
Kathy Andreasen
Technology
Ted Cahall
CTO
Alexander Gounares
Communication
Tricia Wallace
Paid Services
Ned Brody
Ventures, Local & Mapping
Jon Brod
2
AOL Media & Studios
David Eun
Consumer Applications
Brad Garlinghouse
Advertising & Strategy
Jeff Levick
Senior Product Manager
Farhan Memon
Business Development
Jared Grusd
Ethics & Compliance
Kimberly Strong
Diversity & Inclusion
Tiane Gordon
Mobile
Temkin David
Legal
Ira Parker
Investor Relations
Eoin Ryan

The primary function of the food and beverage department is to provide
food and drink to a hotelís guests. In earlier times, when an inn
had a single dining room that could hold a limited number of guests,
this was a fairly simple task. Today, however, providing food and drink
is much more complicated. A large hotel might well have a coffee shop,
a gourmet restaurant, a poolside snack bar, room service, two banquet
halls, and ten function rooms where food and beverages are served. It
might also have a lounge, a nightclub, and a lobby bar. On a busy day
(or night), itís quite likely that functions will be booked in many outlets
at the same time. In addition, some outlets may have multiple events
scheduled for a single day. As you can see, there is great diversity in the
types of activities performed by a food and beverage department, requiring
a significant variety of skills on the part of its workers.
FOOD AND BEVERAGE
DEPARTMENT
34 Chapter 2 Organizational Structure
Because of the diversity of services provided, the food and beverage
department is typically split into subunits. The executive chef, a
person of considerable importance and authority in any full-service hotel,
runs the food production, or kitchen, department. A variety of culinary
specialists who are responsible for different aspects of food preparation
report to the executive chef.
The actual serving of food in a large hotelís restaurants is usually
the responsibility of a separate department, headed by the assistant
food and beverage director. The food service department is composed
of the individual restaurant and outlet managers, maitre dís, waiters,
waitresses, and bus help.
Because of their special duties and concerns, many large hotels
have a separate subunit that is responsible only for room service. Because
of the high value and profit margins associated with the sale of
alcoholic beverages, some hotels have a separate department that assumes
responsibility for all outlets where alcoholic beverages are sold.
The person responsible for this department is the beverage manager.
Most full-service hotels also do a considerable convention and
catering business. The typical convention uses small function rooms
for meetings and larger rooms for general sessions, trade shows, exhibits,
and banquets. As a hotel or lodging business increases the use
of its facilities for conventions and meetings, it may form a separate
convention services department. The convention services department
and its personnel are introduced to the client, a meeting planner, or
an association executive by the marketing and sales department. The
convention services department then handles all of the clientís meeting
and catering requirements. Individually catered events include parties,
wedding receptions, business meetings, and other functions held
by groups. To provide for the unique needs of these types of customers,
hotels often organize separate catering and convention departments.
Depending on the size of the hotel, the job of cleaning the food
and beverage outlets themselves as well as of washing pots and pans,
dishes, glasses, and utensils is often delegated to a subunit known as
the stewarding department.
It is only through continuous cooperation and coordination that a
hotelís food service function can be carried out effectively. A guest who
is dining in a hotel restaurant requires the joint efforts of the kitchen,
food service, beverage, and stewarding departments. A convention banquet
cannot be held without the efforts of the convention and catering
department along with the food production, beverage, and stewarding
departments. The sequence of events and cooperation required
among the food and beverage staff is even more important than in the
rooms department, thus increasing the importance of communication
The Organization of a Lodging Establishment 35
between managers and employees alike. Another challenge faced by
management is the diversity of the employees in the food and beverage
department; the dishwasher in the stewarding department is at a
dramatically different level than the sous chef in the kitchen.
Coordination is not as important an issue in the marketing and sales department,
which is generally much smaller than the food and beverage
department. The primary responsibility of the sales managers who make
up the marketing and sales department is sales, or the selling of the hotel
facilities and services to individuals and groups. Sales managers sell
rooms, food, and beverages to potential clients through advertising, attendance
at association and conference meetings, and direct contacts.
The marketing and sales department is also removed from most of the
day-to-day operational problems faced by other departments. The division
of work among the sales managers is based on the type of customers
a hotel is attempting to attract. Individual sales managers often specialize
in corporate accounts, conventions, or tour and travel markets. Sales
managersí accounts are sometimes subdivided along geographical lines
into regional or national accounts. The sales staff of the largest full-service
hotels usually does not exceed a dozen or so. These sales managers
work more or less independently in their particular market segments.
The human resources department serves no customers, books no business,
and prepares no meals, yet it plays a vital role in a hotelís efficient
operation. As shown in Figure 2Ė1b, the three functions of the
human resources department are employee recruitment, benefits administration,
and training. The director of human resources is also expected
to be an expert on federal and state labor laws and to advise
managers in other departments on these topics. The human resources
departmentís major challenge is in its interactions with other hotel departments.
Although the human resources department recruits, interviews,
and screens prospective employees, the final hiring decision rests
within the department in which the potential employee will be working.
The same is true of promotion and disciplinary decisions; the human
resources departmentís input is, in most cases, limited to advice
and interpretation of legal questions. The human resources departmentís
effectiveness depends on its managerís ability to form effective
working relationships with managers of other departments.
Hello friend,

Here i am up-loading Organisational Chart of AOL, please check attachment below.
Attached Files
File Type: docx Organisational Chart of AOL.docx (18.9 KB, 0 views)
Friends: (0)
Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Tags
area of hrm, career development, career management, career path, career planning, company in us, ethics in hr, hr policies, hrm of us company, hrm practices, human resource management, induction process, job evaluation, job rotation, organisational structure, organization development, organizational culture, orientation process, performance appraisal, personnel management, recruitment process, staffing process, strategic hrm, structure of us company, training development
Related to Organisational Structure of AOL
 

Similar Threads

Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Organisational Structure Prerna Rajan Human Resources Management 2 November 23rd, 2016 03:40 PM
Organisational Structure of ACN Inc. Abhijeet S Human Resources Management (H.R) 1 March 31st, 2016 11:53 AM
Organisational Structure of Always Netra Shetty Human Resources Management (H.R) 0 February 1st, 2011 02:26 PM
Organisational Structure Prerna Rajan Human Resources Management 0 September 6th, 2009 08:18 PM
Organisational structure!!! Arpana Chandra LaUghTeR AccEleRatED , Just CHILL !! 1 May 23rd, 2006 07:53 PM
 


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off


ManagementParadise.com is not responsible for the views and opinion of the posters. The posters and only posters shall be liable for any copyright infringement.



Search Engine Optimization by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.