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Organisational Structure of ABX Air

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Organisational Structure of ABX Air
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Netra Shetty
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Organisational Structure of ABX Air - January 31st, 2011

ABX Air, Inc., formerly Airborne Express, is a cargo airline headquartered at Wilmington Air Park (formerly Airborne Airpark) in unincorporated Clinton County, Ohio, United States, near the City of Wilmington.[1] ABX Air operates scheduled, ad hoc charter and ACMI freight services. It also provides specialist training, maintenance and engineering services, and part sales. ABX Air is owned by Air Transport Services Group (NASDAQ: ATSG).

ABX Air's main customer is DHL, and the vast majority of the freight it carries is for that company. Most of ABX Air's aircraft are painted with DHL's yellow and red livery.

ABX also does cargo flights on behalf of Air Jamaica between Miami and the two Jamaican cities of Montego Bay (Donald Sangster International Airport) and Kingston (Norman Manley International Airport). One of their Boeing 767-200s routinely handles the flights, replacing the Douglas DC-8 types that flew previously. The aircraft fly with an Air Jamaica callsign of "Jamaica".

CEO
Joe Hete
2
President
John Graber
Air Park Services
GS
Aircraft Maintenance
TS
Business Development
SG
5
Flight Operations
Robert Gray
Legal & Secretary
JP
Human Resources


Companies make use of classical and human relations approach to management. The classical management approach did not care about its employees since the belief is that the management is the one that can make the business successful. On the other hand the human relations management approach gave importance to the role and capabilities of the employees on the success of the organization. Classical management approach is used usually by older businesses because it is the one they have been used to. Classical management approach is used by large organizations such as Hutchison Whampoa. This company has been successful in most businesses they have engaged transaction in. It is due to the company making sure that it hires the best managers. This company has a paternalistic style that reduces the right of the employees to discuss what they want. This company keeps its power for itself and it makes decisions based on what the management thinks should be the strategy used by a company. The human relations approach is used by upstart businesses because they believe that to perform well the company has to have a good relationship with the personnel. The human relations approach is used by companies such as Coca Cola wherein the personnel are treated as an integral part of the organization and they are given fair treatment. Coca Cola makes sure that it provides humane treatment to their personnel. The rights, beliefs and principles of the personnel are treated with outmost respect and are always considered by the company before making any decisions. The company also makes sure that it motivates and rewards its personnel.

As their facilities grow in size, lodging managers are faced with the
need to group certain jobs in order to ensure efficient coordination
and control of activities. These job groupings are usually called departments.
In general, departments might be grouped as front of the
house (those departments in which employees have guest contact, such
as front desk), and back of the house (where employees have little
guest contact, such as accounting). However, separating departments
by function is the most common method of organizing a hotel or a
lodging business. Figure 2–1 outlines the departmental structures of a
Figure 2–1 Department Structure in the Hotel and Lodging Industry: (a) Departments of a
Limited-Service Hotel; (b) Departments of a Full-Service Hotel (under 500 rooms)
30 Chapter 2 Organizational Structure
limited-service hotel, a full-service hotel with under 500 rooms, and a
full-service hotel with over 500 rooms. There may be as few as 2 or as
many as 50 employees in a particular department.
In a very small lodging business, such as a bed-and-breakfast, the
owner can supervise each department. However, as the lodging business
increases in size (i.e., above 20 rooms), it is most effective to create
managerial positions within departments.
Typically, the rooms department (called the front desk department in
a limited-service facility) includes reservations, the front office, housekeeping,
and telephone or PBX. In smaller full-service hotels, security
and engineering might also be included in the rooms department. Responsibilities
of the rooms department include reservations, guest reception,
room assignment, tracking the status of rooms (available or
occupied), prompt forwarding of mail and phone messages, security,
housekeeping of guest rooms and public spaces such as lobbies, and
answering guests’ questions. To perform these many duties effectively,
the rooms department may be divided into a number of specialized
subunits. To complicate matters, in many instances these subunits are
also referred to as departments. For example, the laundry department
ROOMS
DEPARTMENT
General Manager
Audit Front Desk Housekeeping Maintenance Sales
General Manager
Rooms
-Reservations
-Front Office
-Housekeeping
-Laundry
-Security
-Engineering
-PBX
-Food Production
-Food Services
-Room Service
-Beverage Manager
-Convention &
Catering
-Stewarding
-Employee
Recruitment
-Benefits Manager
-Training
-Sales Managers -Assistant Controllers
-Finance Operations
-Purchasing
-Storeroom
-Food & Beverage
Controller
-Credit Systems
(a)
(b)
Food & Beverage Human Resources Marketing & Sales Accounting
Figure 2–1 (Continued) (c) Departments of a Full-Service Hotel (over 500 rooms)
The Organization of a Lodging Establishment 31
Assistant General Manager
Director
of
Housekeeping
Front
Office
Manager
Chief
Telecommunication
Operator
Chief
Engineer
Director
Security
Director
Human
Resources
Director
Food &
Beverage
Director
Sales Controller
General Manager
Resident Manager
Assistant
Executive
Housekeeper
Assistant
Front
Office
Manager
Telecommunication
Operator
Assistant
Chief
Engineer
Supervisors
Assistant
F/B
Director
Sales
Manager
Assistant
Controller
Supervisors
Assistant
Managers
Supervisor
Energy
Management
Executive
Chef
-Account
Executives
F/B
Controller
Supervisor
Administration
Supervisor
Preventative
Maintenance
-Security
Officers
Guest
Room
Attendants
Front
Desk
Agents
-HVAC
-Electric
-Water
-Recruitment
-Benefits
-Payroll
-Training
-Labor
Relations
-Sous
Chef
-Kitchen
Staff
-Purchasing
Agent
-Storeroom
Staff
-Inventory
-Work Orders
-Purchasing
-Utilities
-Tools
-Plumbing
-Electric
-Carpentry
-HVAC
-Painting
-Masonry
-Grounds
-Television
-Upholstery
-Pool
Convention
Coordinator
Convention
Services
Manager
Director of
Catering
-Banquet
-Captains
(c)
Valet
Parking
-Service
Staff
Restaurant
Managers
General
Cashiers
-Front Office
Cashiers
-Restaurant
Cashiers
-Timekeeper
Executive
-Steward
-Bartenders
Beverage
Director
32 Chapter 2 Organizational Structure
shown in Figure 2–1b is responsible for cleaning and pressing all the
hotel’s linens and employee uniforms as well as guest laundry. Because
of its specialized function, little of the knowledge and skills required
to manage a laundry operation is transferable to other areas of hotel
operations.
The front office is one of the most important departments in a hotel,
as it often offers the only contact between guests and staff. A hotel’s
front office is where guests are greeted when they arrive, where
they are registered and assigned to a room, and where they check out.
Usually, the telephone operator, other guest communications functions,
and the bell staff or those employees responsible for delivering
luggage and messages and attending to special guest requests also fall
under the front office umbrella. The reservations department takes
and tracks the hotel’s future bookings. The housekeeping department
is responsible for cleaning guest rooms and public spaces. Because of
their specialized nature, the security and engineering departments are
discussed in separate sections.
A great deal of interdependence exists among the subunits of the
rooms department. For example, reservations must inform the front
office of the number of presold rooms each day to ensure that a current
inventory of salable rooms is always available. On the other hand,
the front office must let reservations know whenever walk-in guests
(those who do not have reservations) register. A similar level of cooperation
is required between the front office and housekeeping. When
a guest checks out, the front office must inform housekeeping so that
the room may be cleaned. Once a room is cleaned, housekeeping must
inform the front office so that the room may be sold. Certain tasks
within the rooms department must occur in a specific order. For example,
housekeeping cannot properly provision a guest room if the laundry
does not supply enough clean towels or bed sheets. Engineering cannot
replace a defective light switch in a guest room if housekeeping does
not report the problem. Effective management of this busy department
calls for standardized plans, procedures, schedules, and deadlines, as
well as frequent direct communication between the executives who manage
the key operating units of the rooms department.
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Last edited by netrashetty; February 1st, 2011 at 04:53 PM..
   
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Re: Organisational Structure of ABX Air
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James Cord
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Re: Organisational Structure of ABX Air - March 31st, 2016

Quote:
Originally Posted by netrashetty View Post
ABX Air, Inc., formerly Airborne Express, is a cargo airline headquartered at Wilmington Air Park (formerly Airborne Airpark) in unincorporated Clinton County, Ohio, United States, near the City of Wilmington.[1] ABX Air operates scheduled, ad hoc charter and ACMI freight services. It also provides specialist training, maintenance and engineering services, and part sales. ABX Air is owned by Air Transport Services Group (NASDAQ: ATSG).

ABX Air's main customer is DHL, and the vast majority of the freight it carries is for that company. Most of ABX Air's aircraft are painted with DHL's yellow and red livery.

ABX also does cargo flights on behalf of Air Jamaica between Miami and the two Jamaican cities of Montego Bay (Donald Sangster International Airport) and Kingston (Norman Manley International Airport). One of their Boeing 767-200s routinely handles the flights, replacing the Douglas DC-8 types that flew previously. The aircraft fly with an Air Jamaica callsign of "Jamaica".

CEO
Joe Hete
2
President
John Graber
Air Park Services
GS
Aircraft Maintenance
TS
Business Development
SG
5
Flight Operations
Robert Gray
Legal & Secretary
JP
Human Resources


Companies make use of classical and human relations approach to management. The classical management approach did not care about its employees since the belief is that the management is the one that can make the business successful. On the other hand the human relations management approach gave importance to the role and capabilities of the employees on the success of the organization. Classical management approach is used usually by older businesses because it is the one they have been used to. Classical management approach is used by large organizations such as Hutchison Whampoa. This company has been successful in most businesses they have engaged transaction in. It is due to the company making sure that it hires the best managers. This company has a paternalistic style that reduces the right of the employees to discuss what they want. This company keeps its power for itself and it makes decisions based on what the management thinks should be the strategy used by a company. The human relations approach is used by upstart businesses because they believe that to perform well the company has to have a good relationship with the personnel. The human relations approach is used by companies such as Coca Cola wherein the personnel are treated as an integral part of the organization and they are given fair treatment. Coca Cola makes sure that it provides humane treatment to their personnel. The rights, beliefs and principles of the personnel are treated with outmost respect and are always considered by the company before making any decisions. The company also makes sure that it motivates and rewards its personnel.

As their facilities grow in size, lodging managers are faced with the
need to group certain jobs in order to ensure efficient coordination
and control of activities. These job groupings are usually called departments.
In general, departments might be grouped as front of the
house (those departments in which employees have guest contact, such
as front desk), and back of the house (where employees have little
guest contact, such as accounting). However, separating departments
by function is the most common method of organizing a hotel or a
lodging business. Figure 2–1 outlines the departmental structures of a
Figure 2–1 Department Structure in the Hotel and Lodging Industry: (a) Departments of a
Limited-Service Hotel; (b) Departments of a Full-Service Hotel (under 500 rooms)
30 Chapter 2 Organizational Structure
limited-service hotel, a full-service hotel with under 500 rooms, and a
full-service hotel with over 500 rooms. There may be as few as 2 or as
many as 50 employees in a particular department.
In a very small lodging business, such as a bed-and-breakfast, the
owner can supervise each department. However, as the lodging business
increases in size (i.e., above 20 rooms), it is most effective to create
managerial positions within departments.
Typically, the rooms department (called the front desk department in
a limited-service facility) includes reservations, the front office, housekeeping,
and telephone or PBX. In smaller full-service hotels, security
and engineering might also be included in the rooms department. Responsibilities
of the rooms department include reservations, guest reception,
room assignment, tracking the status of rooms (available or
occupied), prompt forwarding of mail and phone messages, security,
housekeeping of guest rooms and public spaces such as lobbies, and
answering guests’ questions. To perform these many duties effectively,
the rooms department may be divided into a number of specialized
subunits. To complicate matters, in many instances these subunits are
also referred to as departments. For example, the laundry department
ROOMS
DEPARTMENT
General Manager
Audit Front Desk Housekeeping Maintenance Sales
General Manager
Rooms
-Reservations
-Front Office
-Housekeeping
-Laundry
-Security
-Engineering
-PBX
-Food Production
-Food Services
-Room Service
-Beverage Manager
-Convention &
Catering
-Stewarding
-Employee
Recruitment
-Benefits Manager
-Training
-Sales Managers -Assistant Controllers
-Finance Operations
-Purchasing
-Storeroom
-Food & Beverage
Controller
-Credit Systems
(a)
(b)
Food & Beverage Human Resources Marketing & Sales Accounting
Figure 2–1 (Continued) (c) Departments of a Full-Service Hotel (over 500 rooms)
The Organization of a Lodging Establishment 31
Assistant General Manager
Director
of
Housekeeping
Front
Office
Manager
Chief
Telecommunication
Operator
Chief
Engineer
Director
Security
Director
Human
Resources
Director
Food &
Beverage
Director
Sales Controller
General Manager
Resident Manager
Assistant
Executive
Housekeeper
Assistant
Front
Office
Manager
Telecommunication
Operator
Assistant
Chief
Engineer
Supervisors
Assistant
F/B
Director
Sales
Manager
Assistant
Controller
Supervisors
Assistant
Managers
Supervisor
Energy
Management
Executive
Chef
-Account
Executives
F/B
Controller
Supervisor
Administration
Supervisor
Preventative
Maintenance
-Security
Officers
Guest
Room
Attendants
Front
Desk
Agents
-HVAC
-Electric
-Water
-Recruitment
-Benefits
-Payroll
-Training
-Labor
Relations
-Sous
Chef
-Kitchen
Staff
-Purchasing
Agent
-Storeroom
Staff
-Inventory
-Work Orders
-Purchasing
-Utilities
-Tools
-Plumbing
-Electric
-Carpentry
-HVAC
-Painting
-Masonry
-Grounds
-Television
-Upholstery
-Pool
Convention
Coordinator
Convention
Services
Manager
Director of
Catering
-Banquet
-Captains
(c)
Valet
Parking
-Service
Staff
Restaurant
Managers
General
Cashiers
-Front Office
Cashiers
-Restaurant
Cashiers
-Timekeeper
Executive
-Steward
-Bartenders
Beverage
Director
32 Chapter 2 Organizational Structure
shown in Figure 2–1b is responsible for cleaning and pressing all the
hotel’s linens and employee uniforms as well as guest laundry. Because
of its specialized function, little of the knowledge and skills required
to manage a laundry operation is transferable to other areas of hotel
operations.
The front office is one of the most important departments in a hotel,
as it often offers the only contact between guests and staff. A hotel’s
front office is where guests are greeted when they arrive, where
they are registered and assigned to a room, and where they check out.
Usually, the telephone operator, other guest communications functions,
and the bell staff or those employees responsible for delivering
luggage and messages and attending to special guest requests also fall
under the front office umbrella. The reservations department takes
and tracks the hotel’s future bookings. The housekeeping department
is responsible for cleaning guest rooms and public spaces. Because of
their specialized nature, the security and engineering departments are
discussed in separate sections.
A great deal of interdependence exists among the subunits of the
rooms department. For example, reservations must inform the front
office of the number of presold rooms each day to ensure that a current
inventory of salable rooms is always available. On the other hand,
the front office must let reservations know whenever walk-in guests
(those who do not have reservations) register. A similar level of cooperation
is required between the front office and housekeeping. When
a guest checks out, the front office must inform housekeeping so that
the room may be cleaned. Once a room is cleaned, housekeeping must
inform the front office so that the room may be sold. Certain tasks
within the rooms department must occur in a specific order. For example,
housekeeping cannot properly provision a guest room if the laundry
does not supply enough clean towels or bed sheets. Engineering cannot
replace a defective light switch in a guest room if housekeeping does
not report the problem. Effective management of this busy department
calls for standardized plans, procedures, schedules, and deadlines, as
well as frequent direct communication between the executives who manage
the key operating units of the rooms department.
Hey netra,

Here i am uploading Organisational Chart of ABX Air, so please download and check it.
Attached Files
File Type: docx Organisational Chart of ABX Air.docx (75.3 KB, 0 views)
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