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Organisational Structure of ABM Industries

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Netra Shetty
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Organisational Structure of ABM Industries - January 31st, 2011

ABM Industries Incorporated NYSE: ABM is an American corporation involved in outsourced, building maintenance. Wholly owned subsidiaries include ABM Janitorial, Ampco System Parking, ABM Engineering, ABM Security Services (known formerly as American Commercial Security Services), Security Services of America (SSA), Amtech Lighting, and ABM Facility Services.

Founded in 1909 by Morris Rosenberg as a one-man window washing business, they took the name American Building Maintenance in 1913. In 1927, they acquired Easterday Janitorial Supply Company. His sons took over after his death.

They were listed in 1945 on the American Stock Exchange. In 1967, Ampco Auto Parks, which became Ampco System Parking in 1993, became the newest Division of the Company. In 1972 they were listed on the New York Stock Exchange.

Through a series of mergers and acquisitions, ABM had revenues above $2 billion as of 2001. The company and its CEO Henrik Slipsager were featured in the second season of the CBS reality show Undercover Boss.

CEO
Henrik Slipsager
3
Chairman of the Board
Maryellen Herringer
Director
Henry Kotkins
4
Director
Anthony Fernandes
Director
Luke Helms
3
Director
William Steele
Director
Dan Bane
Director
Philip Ferguson
Director
Linda Chavez
2
CFO
James Lusk
Janitorial Services
James McClure
Facility Services
SZ
2
Development & Marketing
Gary Wallace
Legal & Secretary
SM
Human Resources
EA
Communication
Tony Mitchell
Investor Relations
DF


Organizing, the process of structuring human and physical resources
in order to accomplish organizational objectives, involves dividing tasks
into jobs, specifying the appropriate department for each job, determining
the optimum number of jobs in each department, and delegating
authority within and among departments. One of the most critical
challenges facing lodging managers today is the development of
a responsive organizational structure that is committed to quality.1
The framework of jobs and departments that make up any organization
must be directed toward achieving the organization’s objectives.
In other words, the structure of a lodging business must be consistent
with its strategy.2
Managers give structure to a hotel and lodging through job specialization,
organization, and establishment of patterns of authority
and span of control.3
JOB SPECIALIZATION
There are as many degrees of job specialization within the lodging industry
as there are types of organizations—and, as you learned in chapter
1, there are many types of organizations. One extreme is the case
of a hotel where the owner/operator is responsible for checking in
the guests, servicing their needs, taking care of the housekeeping for
the guest rooms, maintaining the building and grounds, and checking
out the guests. There is, to be sure, much to recommend this
method of work. It is rewarding to have total control over a project
from beginning to end, and many people find it motivating to see the
results of their efforts. However, as the demand for additional products
or services increases (i.e., if additional rooms are added or another
hotel is purchased), it becomes more and more difficult for an
individual to do his or her job well. One benefit of the increased workload
is increased revenue, which would enable the individual hotel operator
to add housekeeping staff, one or more front desk agents to
check in and check out the additional guests, and engineering and
maintenance personnel to care for the building and grounds.
As a general rule, specialization increases worker productivity and
efficiency. On the other hand, delegating jobs increases the need for
managerial control and coordination. Someone has to make sure that
housekeeping staff come in after the painters have repainted a room
(and that the paint is dry), not before! A crucial element of hotel and
The Organization of a Lodging Establishment 29
lodging management is coordinating the many specialized functions
within hotels so that the organization runs smoothly.
Specialization has its own set of problems; it can result in workers
performing the same tasks over and over again. A point can be reached
where the degree of specialization so narrows a job’s scope that the
worker finds little joy or satisfaction in it. Signs of overspecialization
include workers’ loss of interest, lowered morale, increasing error rate,
and reduction in service and product quality.
One solution to this problem is to modify jobs so that teams can
perform them. Instead of a single guest room attendant being assigned
to a group of rooms, a work team in a hotel housekeeping department
might clean all of the rooms on a particular floor. Some establishments
use teams regularly throughout the organization; others use teams
more selectively. Teams can be directed by a manager or can be selfmanaged.
The idea behind self-managed work teams is for workers to
become their own managers, which increases their self-reliance as well
as develops a talent pool.
A concept called the quality circle is based on the belief that the
people who actually do the work, rather than their managers, are the
ones who are best able to identify, analyze, and correct problems they
encounter. The idea originated in Japan in 1962. The quality circle is
a group of employees, usually fewer than ten, who perform similar jobs
and meet once per week to discuss their work, identify problems, and
present possible solutions to those problems. For example, a quality
circle might be formed among front desk agents. The group forwards
its findings and proposals to management for evaluation and action.
Quality circles are most successful when they are part of an organization-
wide improvement effort. American business picked up on the
quality circle concept in the mid-1970s.4
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Re: Organisational Structure of ABM Industries
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James Cord
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Re: Organisational Structure of ABM Industries - March 31st, 2016

Quote:
Originally Posted by netrashetty View Post
ABM Industries Incorporated NYSE: ABM is an American corporation involved in outsourced, building maintenance. Wholly owned subsidiaries include ABM Janitorial, Ampco System Parking, ABM Engineering, ABM Security Services (known formerly as American Commercial Security Services), Security Services of America (SSA), Amtech Lighting, and ABM Facility Services.

Founded in 1909 by Morris Rosenberg as a one-man window washing business, they took the name American Building Maintenance in 1913. In 1927, they acquired Easterday Janitorial Supply Company. His sons took over after his death.

They were listed in 1945 on the American Stock Exchange. In 1967, Ampco Auto Parks, which became Ampco System Parking in 1993, became the newest Division of the Company. In 1972 they were listed on the New York Stock Exchange.

Through a series of mergers and acquisitions, ABM had revenues above $2 billion as of 2001. The company and its CEO Henrik Slipsager were featured in the second season of the CBS reality show Undercover Boss.

CEO
Henrik Slipsager
3
Chairman of the Board
Maryellen Herringer
Director
Henry Kotkins
4
Director
Anthony Fernandes
Director
Luke Helms
3
Director
William Steele
Director
Dan Bane
Director
Philip Ferguson
Director
Linda Chavez
2
CFO
James Lusk
Janitorial Services
James McClure
Facility Services
SZ
2
Development & Marketing
Gary Wallace
Legal & Secretary
SM
Human Resources
EA
Communication
Tony Mitchell
Investor Relations
DF


Organizing, the process of structuring human and physical resources
in order to accomplish organizational objectives, involves dividing tasks
into jobs, specifying the appropriate department for each job, determining
the optimum number of jobs in each department, and delegating
authority within and among departments. One of the most critical
challenges facing lodging managers today is the development of
a responsive organizational structure that is committed to quality.1
The framework of jobs and departments that make up any organization
must be directed toward achieving the organization’s objectives.
In other words, the structure of a lodging business must be consistent
with its strategy.2
Managers give structure to a hotel and lodging through job specialization,
organization, and establishment of patterns of authority
and span of control.3
JOB SPECIALIZATION
There are as many degrees of job specialization within the lodging industry
as there are types of organizations—and, as you learned in chapter
1, there are many types of organizations. One extreme is the case
of a hotel where the owner/operator is responsible for checking in
the guests, servicing their needs, taking care of the housekeeping for
the guest rooms, maintaining the building and grounds, and checking
out the guests. There is, to be sure, much to recommend this
method of work. It is rewarding to have total control over a project
from beginning to end, and many people find it motivating to see the
results of their efforts. However, as the demand for additional products
or services increases (i.e., if additional rooms are added or another
hotel is purchased), it becomes more and more difficult for an
individual to do his or her job well. One benefit of the increased workload
is increased revenue, which would enable the individual hotel operator
to add housekeeping staff, one or more front desk agents to
check in and check out the additional guests, and engineering and
maintenance personnel to care for the building and grounds.
As a general rule, specialization increases worker productivity and
efficiency. On the other hand, delegating jobs increases the need for
managerial control and coordination. Someone has to make sure that
housekeeping staff come in after the painters have repainted a room
(and that the paint is dry), not before! A crucial element of hotel and
The Organization of a Lodging Establishment 29
lodging management is coordinating the many specialized functions
within hotels so that the organization runs smoothly.
Specialization has its own set of problems; it can result in workers
performing the same tasks over and over again. A point can be reached
where the degree of specialization so narrows a job’s scope that the
worker finds little joy or satisfaction in it. Signs of overspecialization
include workers’ loss of interest, lowered morale, increasing error rate,
and reduction in service and product quality.
One solution to this problem is to modify jobs so that teams can
perform them. Instead of a single guest room attendant being assigned
to a group of rooms, a work team in a hotel housekeeping department
might clean all of the rooms on a particular floor. Some establishments
use teams regularly throughout the organization; others use teams
more selectively. Teams can be directed by a manager or can be selfmanaged.
The idea behind self-managed work teams is for workers to
become their own managers, which increases their self-reliance as well
as develops a talent pool.
A concept called the quality circle is based on the belief that the
people who actually do the work, rather than their managers, are the
ones who are best able to identify, analyze, and correct problems they
encounter. The idea originated in Japan in 1962. The quality circle is
a group of employees, usually fewer than ten, who perform similar jobs
and meet once per week to discuss their work, identify problems, and
present possible solutions to those problems. For example, a quality
circle might be formed among front desk agents. The group forwards
its findings and proposals to management for evaluation and action.
Quality circles are most successful when they are part of an organization-
wide improvement effort. American business picked up on the
quality circle concept in the mid-1970s.4
Hello netra,

I am also uploading a document which will give more detailed explanation on Organisational Chart of ABM.
Attached Files
File Type: docx Organisational Chart of ABM.docx (68.1 KB, 0 views)
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