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Netra Shetty
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Human Resource Management of Red River Broadcasting - January 27th, 2011

Question book-new.svg
This article needs additional citations for verification.
Please help improve this article by adding reliable references. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (July 2008)

Red River Broadcasting is a television and radio broadcasting company based in Fargo, North Dakota, which operates a network of Fox affiliates in eastern North Dakota and northwestern Minnesota. The company also owns TV and radio stations in South Dakota and Minnesota. The radio division is known as Red Rock Radio.

Red River Broadcasting is currently owned by Myron Kunin of Minneapolis, Minnesota (85%), who founded Regis Corporation, and Romeo "Ro" Grignon of Ponsford, Minnesota (15%).

has traditionally
been used by organizations to ensure that the right person
is in the right job at the right time. Under past conditions
of relative environmental certainty and stability, human
resource planning focused on the short term and was dic-
tated largely by line management concerns. Increasing
environmental instability, demographic shifts, changes in
technology, and heightened international competition are
changing the need for and the nature of human resource
planning in leading organizations. Planning is increas-
ingly the product of the interaction between line manage-
ment and planners. In addition, organizations are real-
izing that in order to adequately address human resource
concerns, they must develop long-term as well as short-
term solutions. As human resource planners involve
themselves in more programs to serve the needs of the
business, and even influence the direction of the business,
they face new and increased responsibilities and chal-
lenges.

In an early treatment of the topic, Vetter (1967) defined
human resource planning as

the process by which management determines how the orga-
nization should move from its current manpower position to
its desired position. Through planning, management strives to
have the right number and the right kinds of people, at the right
places, at the right time, doing things which result in both the
organization and the individual receiving maximum long-run
benefits. (p. 15)

Contemporary human resource planning occurs within
the broad context of organizational and strategic business
planning. It involves forecasting the organization's future
human resource needs and planning for how those needs
will be met. It includes establishing objectives and then
developing and implementing programs (staffing, ap-
praising, compensating, and training) to ensure that peo-
ple are available with the appropriate characteristics and
skills when and where the organization needs them. It
may also involve developing and implementing programs
to improve employee performance or to increase em-
ployee satisfaction and involvement in order to boost or-
ganizational productivity, quality, or innovation (Mills,
1 985b). Finally, human resource planning includes gath-
ering data that can be used to evaluate the effectiveness
of ongoing programs and inform planners when revisions
i n their forecasts and programs are needed.
Because a major objective of planning is facilitating

Copyright 1990 by the American Psychological Association, Inc. 0003.066X/90/$00.75
Vol. 45, No. 2, 223-239

some of the activities that industrial/organizational (I/O)
psychologists are engaged in as they seek to improve the
competitiveness of organizations through effective human
resource planning.

Factors Underlying Increased Interest in
Human Resource Planning

Undoubtedly, there are many factors that account for the
increased attention directed to human resource planning,
but environmental forces-globalization, new technolo-
gies, economic conditions, and a changing work force-
seem particularly potent (Dumaine, 1989; Dyer & Heyer,
1984; Greenhalgh, McKersie, & Gilkey, 1986). These
create complexity and uncertainty for organizations. Un-
certainty can interfere with efficient operations, so or-
ganizations typically attempt to reduce its impact; formal
planning is one common tactic used by organizations to
buffer themselves from environmental uncertainty
(Thompson, 1967).
The changing characteristics of the work force, which
is but one important environmental factor, make the
need for planning evident. Between 1976 and 1980, the
labor force grew an average of 2.8%, but between 1991
and 1995, the rate of growth will drop to 1.1 %. Addi-
tionally, whereas more than 3 million people joined the
labor force in 1978, less than 2 million people are pro-
jected to enter the labor force each year from 1987 to
1995. Comparatively, the proportion of younger people
(aged 16 to 24) and older people (aged 55 and over) in
the work force will decline. People aged 25 to 54 will
constitute a greater percentage of the labor force, increas-
ing from 61% in 1975 to 73% in 1995. The number of
mothers in the work force with children under one year
old incre ased from 42% in 1980 to 55% in 1989. The
ethnic mix of the labor force is also changing. The Bureau
of Labor Statistics estimates that ethnic minorities will
account for 57% of the growth in the labor force between
now and the year 2000. Of the approximately 25 million
workers added to the work force between 1985 and 2000,
42% are expected to be native White women and only
15% are expected to be native White men. Fully 22% are
expected to be immigrants (Glickman, 1982; Johnston
& Packer, 1987; "Managing Now," 1988; "Needed," 1988;
Nelton, 1988).
All of these demographic projections have significant
i mplications for managing human resources, thereby in-
creasing the importance of human resource planning
(Coates, 1987; Davis & Associates, 1986). The changing
demographics mean there will be fewer entry-level em-
ployees, so competition among employers will increase.
In addition, the changing demographics signal changes
in the abilities, skills, interests, and values of tomorrow's
work force. For example, shortages of many types of
skilled workers are imminent, including tool-and-die
makers, bricklayers, shipbuilders, mechanics, machinists,
and engineers ("Early Retirement," 1987). Even if or-
ganizations are willing to train new employees, the task
may be difficult, as the U.S. Navy has found. At a time
when many of its training manuals required 12th-grade

reading skills, nearly one fourth of the high school grad-
uates who entered the Navy read below the 10th-grade
level (National Alliance of Business, 1986). Such statistics
are alarming when compared to projections indicating
that the levels of various skills needed for new jobs are
likely to increase in the future (see Johnston & Packer,
1987).
A consideration of how the values of workers who
will soon make up the majority of the work force differ
from those who will begin to leave it suggests additional
changes on the horizon. There is already evidence of
growing resistance from employees to relocation. Greater
emphasis on self-evaluation and a reduction in loyalty
and dedication to employers makes it more difficult for
organizations to assume they can move employees around
anywhere and anytime (Maccoby, 1988; Mills, 1987). A
decline in organizational loyalty is occurring at the same
time that workers are feeling insecure about their em-
ployment (Hay Group, 1988).
A recent study comparing the work values of those
over 40 years old with those under 40 years old suggested
other types of changes for which organizations must pre-
pare. For example, employees from the younger genera-
tion, who grew up during the Vietnam war, do not trust
authority as much as do members of the older generation,
who are products of the World War II era. The younger
generation thinks work should be fun, whereas the older
generation sees work as a duty and vehicle for financial
support. Younger employees believe people should ad-
vance as quickly as their competence permits, whereas
older workers believe that experience is the necessary road
to promotion. Finally, this study found that for the youn-
ger generation, "fairness" means allowing people to be
different, but for the older generation it means treating
people equally ("Work Attitudes," 1986).
Changes in the work force are just one aspect of the
environment stimulating the need for human resource
planning. The demographic changes are somewhat pre-
dictable, but when they are considered in combination
with changing technology (see Davis & Associates, 1986)
and many of the other external changes described else-
where in this issue (e.g., by Offermann & Gowing, pp.
95-108), they pose significant challenges for human re-
source planning and contribute to its changing status
during the past two decades.

A Model for Describing Human
Resource Planning

In the remainder of this article, we describe the activities
engaged in by human resource planners in leading or-
ganizations. Throughout our discussion, we describe four
phases of human resource planning: (a) gathering and
analyzing data to forecast expected human resource de-
mand, given business plans for the future, and to forecast
future human resource supply; (b) establishing human
resource objectives; (c) designing and implementing pro-
grams that will enable the organization to achieve its hu-
man resource objectives; and (d) monitoring and evalu-
ating these programs (Burack, 1988; Odiorne, 1981). Ac-


Strategic management of human resources is equally important for multinationals

to maximize performance. Issues such as recruiting, selection, training, compensation,

and performance management require careful planning and organizing. Such issues

contribute to employee motivation, satisfaction, performance, and empowerment which

are critical to an organization’s effectiveness.(Yeung


The word RECRUITMENT refers to the process of gather, searching, keeping or offering potential candidates for the job. This is what we have been studied so far about recruiting but its not just to that. Its more than this.

In order to be successful and have competitive advantage in the market, you need to have some well organized and skilled workforce in your organization. Successful employee planning is designed to identify an organizations human resource needs. Once there needs are known, an organization will want to do something about meeting them. The next step, then in the staffing function assuming of course, that demand for certain skills, knowledge and abilities is greater than the current supply, is recruiting.

The activity makes this possible for a company to acquire the people necessary to ensure the continued operation of the organization. Recruiting is the process of discovering potential candidates for actual or anticipated organizational vacancies. In other perspective, it is a linking activity that brings together those with jobs to fill and those seeking jobs.

The recruitment process should be capable to give enough information about the job so the each and every candidates could analyze the required with his capabilities. It makes the whole process easy for the recruiter because by giving extensive information about the job separates the unqualified candidates form the list and that makes the list filtered.


5.1 Recruitment & the culture

In every profession, there's a hierarchy of common strategies that organizational leaders can select from and implement to meet the needs of their organization.
In the recruiting profession, the strategy at the top of the hierarchy is a "recruiting culture" strategy. Nicknamed by many as "the ultimate strategy," a recruiting culture strategy is one that transforms every employee into a 24/7 talent scout. Visiting an organization that employs such a strategy is a take-your-breath-away experience — because recruiting, rather than being some obscure function buried within the HR bureaucracy, is recognized as a primary driver of business success.
Yes, the business success, not HR success. The single factor that makes a recruiting culture unique is the realization among executives, managers, and employees that great recruiting is essential in order to "move the needle" of business success. This realization enables recruiting to permeate the very fiber of the organization. Using any criteria, building a recruiting culture should be the goal of any recruiting director worth their weight in salt.
Unfortunately, recruiting cultures are beyond the capabilities or even interests of most recruiting directors, and as a result, they're as scarce as tofu .From observation, there have only been a handful of recruiting cultures developed in recent history. Each has been a true work of art convincing the entire organization from the CEO on down that recruiting is so critical that everyone must be an active talent scout.
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Re: Human Resource Management of Red River Broadcasting
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James Cord
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Re: Human Resource Management of Red River Broadcasting - March 28th, 2016

Quote:
Originally Posted by netrashetty View Post
Question book-new.svg
This article needs additional citations for verification.
Please help improve this article by adding reliable references. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (July 2008)

Red River Broadcasting is a television and radio broadcasting company based in Fargo, North Dakota, which operates a network of Fox affiliates in eastern North Dakota and northwestern Minnesota. The company also owns TV and radio stations in South Dakota and Minnesota. The radio division is known as Red Rock Radio.

Red River Broadcasting is currently owned by Myron Kunin of Minneapolis, Minnesota (85%), who founded Regis Corporation, and Romeo "Ro" Grignon of Ponsford, Minnesota (15%).

has traditionally
been used by organizations to ensure that the right person
is in the right job at the right time. Under past conditions
of relative environmental certainty and stability, human
resource planning focused on the short term and was dic-
tated largely by line management concerns. Increasing
environmental instability, demographic shifts, changes in
technology, and heightened international competition are
changing the need for and the nature of human resource
planning in leading organizations. Planning is increas-
ingly the product of the interaction between line manage-
ment and planners. In addition, organizations are real-
izing that in order to adequately address human resource
concerns, they must develop long-term as well as short-
term solutions. As human resource planners involve
themselves in more programs to serve the needs of the
business, and even influence the direction of the business,
they face new and increased responsibilities and chal-
lenges.

In an early treatment of the topic, Vetter (1967) defined
human resource planning as

the process by which management determines how the orga-
nization should move from its current manpower position to
its desired position. Through planning, management strives to
have the right number and the right kinds of people, at the right
places, at the right time, doing things which result in both the
organization and the individual receiving maximum long-run
benefits. (p. 15)

Contemporary human resource planning occurs within
the broad context of organizational and strategic business
planning. It involves forecasting the organization's future
human resource needs and planning for how those needs
will be met. It includes establishing objectives and then
developing and implementing programs (staffing, ap-
praising, compensating, and training) to ensure that peo-
ple are available with the appropriate characteristics and
skills when and where the organization needs them. It
may also involve developing and implementing programs
to improve employee performance or to increase em-
ployee satisfaction and involvement in order to boost or-
ganizational productivity, quality, or innovation (Mills,
1 985b). Finally, human resource planning includes gath-
ering data that can be used to evaluate the effectiveness
of ongoing programs and inform planners when revisions
i n their forecasts and programs are needed.
Because a major objective of planning is facilitating

Copyright 1990 by the American Psychological Association, Inc. 0003.066X/90/$00.75
Vol. 45, No. 2, 223-239

some of the activities that industrial/organizational (I/O)
psychologists are engaged in as they seek to improve the
competitiveness of organizations through effective human
resource planning.

Factors Underlying Increased Interest in
Human Resource Planning

Undoubtedly, there are many factors that account for the
increased attention directed to human resource planning,
but environmental forces-globalization, new technolo-
gies, economic conditions, and a changing work force-
seem particularly potent (Dumaine, 1989; Dyer & Heyer,
1984; Greenhalgh, McKersie, & Gilkey, 1986). These
create complexity and uncertainty for organizations. Un-
certainty can interfere with efficient operations, so or-
ganizations typically attempt to reduce its impact; formal
planning is one common tactic used by organizations to
buffer themselves from environmental uncertainty
(Thompson, 1967).
The changing characteristics of the work force, which
is but one important environmental factor, make the
need for planning evident. Between 1976 and 1980, the
labor force grew an average of 2.8%, but between 1991
and 1995, the rate of growth will drop to 1.1 %. Addi-
tionally, whereas more than 3 million people joined the
labor force in 1978, less than 2 million people are pro-
jected to enter the labor force each year from 1987 to
1995. Comparatively, the proportion of younger people
(aged 16 to 24) and older people (aged 55 and over) in
the work force will decline. People aged 25 to 54 will
constitute a greater percentage of the labor force, increas-
ing from 61% in 1975 to 73% in 1995. The number of
mothers in the work force with children under one year
old incre ased from 42% in 1980 to 55% in 1989. The
ethnic mix of the labor force is also changing. The Bureau
of Labor Statistics estimates that ethnic minorities will
account for 57% of the growth in the labor force between
now and the year 2000. Of the approximately 25 million
workers added to the work force between 1985 and 2000,
42% are expected to be native White women and only
15% are expected to be native White men. Fully 22% are
expected to be immigrants (Glickman, 1982; Johnston
& Packer, 1987; "Managing Now," 1988; "Needed," 1988;
Nelton, 1988).
All of these demographic projections have significant
i mplications for managing human resources, thereby in-
creasing the importance of human resource planning
(Coates, 1987; Davis & Associates, 1986). The changing
demographics mean there will be fewer entry-level em-
ployees, so competition among employers will increase.
In addition, the changing demographics signal changes
in the abilities, skills, interests, and values of tomorrow's
work force. For example, shortages of many types of
skilled workers are imminent, including tool-and-die
makers, bricklayers, shipbuilders, mechanics, machinists,
and engineers ("Early Retirement," 1987). Even if or-
ganizations are willing to train new employees, the task
may be difficult, as the U.S. Navy has found. At a time
when many of its training manuals required 12th-grade

reading skills, nearly one fourth of the high school grad-
uates who entered the Navy read below the 10th-grade
level (National Alliance of Business, 1986). Such statistics
are alarming when compared to projections indicating
that the levels of various skills needed for new jobs are
likely to increase in the future (see Johnston & Packer,
1987).
A consideration of how the values of workers who
will soon make up the majority of the work force differ
from those who will begin to leave it suggests additional
changes on the horizon. There is already evidence of
growing resistance from employees to relocation. Greater
emphasis on self-evaluation and a reduction in loyalty
and dedication to employers makes it more difficult for
organizations to assume they can move employees around
anywhere and anytime (Maccoby, 1988; Mills, 1987). A
decline in organizational loyalty is occurring at the same
time that workers are feeling insecure about their em-
ployment (Hay Group, 1988).
A recent study comparing the work values of those
over 40 years old with those under 40 years old suggested
other types of changes for which organizations must pre-
pare. For example, employees from the younger genera-
tion, who grew up during the Vietnam war, do not trust
authority as much as do members of the older generation,
who are products of the World War II era. The younger
generation thinks work should be fun, whereas the older
generation sees work as a duty and vehicle for financial
support. Younger employees believe people should ad-
vance as quickly as their competence permits, whereas
older workers believe that experience is the necessary road
to promotion. Finally, this study found that for the youn-
ger generation, "fairness" means allowing people to be
different, but for the older generation it means treating
people equally ("Work Attitudes," 1986).
Changes in the work force are just one aspect of the
environment stimulating the need for human resource
planning. The demographic changes are somewhat pre-
dictable, but when they are considered in combination
with changing technology (see Davis & Associates, 1986)
and many of the other external changes described else-
where in this issue (e.g., by Offermann & Gowing, pp.
95-108), they pose significant challenges for human re-
source planning and contribute to its changing status
during the past two decades.

A Model for Describing Human
Resource Planning

In the remainder of this article, we describe the activities
engaged in by human resource planners in leading or-
ganizations. Throughout our discussion, we describe four
phases of human resource planning: (a) gathering and
analyzing data to forecast expected human resource de-
mand, given business plans for the future, and to forecast
future human resource supply; (b) establishing human
resource objectives; (c) designing and implementing pro-
grams that will enable the organization to achieve its hu-
man resource objectives; and (d) monitoring and evalu-
ating these programs (Burack, 1988; Odiorne, 1981). Ac-


Strategic management of human resources is equally important for multinationals

to maximize performance. Issues such as recruiting, selection, training, compensation,

and performance management require careful planning and organizing. Such issues

contribute to employee motivation, satisfaction, performance, and empowerment which

are critical to an organizations effectiveness.(Yeung


The word RECRUITMENT refers to the process of gather, searching, keeping or offering potential candidates for the job. This is what we have been studied so far about recruiting but its not just to that. Its more than this.

In order to be successful and have competitive advantage in the market, you need to have some well organized and skilled workforce in your organization. Successful employee planning is designed to identify an organizations human resource needs. Once there needs are known, an organization will want to do something about meeting them. The next step, then in the staffing function assuming of course, that demand for certain skills, knowledge and abilities is greater than the current supply, is recruiting.

The activity makes this possible for a company to acquire the people necessary to ensure the continued operation of the organization. Recruiting is the process of discovering potential candidates for actual or anticipated organizational vacancies. In other perspective, it is a linking activity that brings together those with jobs to fill and those seeking jobs.

The recruitment process should be capable to give enough information about the job so the each and every candidates could analyze the required with his capabilities. It makes the whole process easy for the recruiter because by giving extensive information about the job separates the unqualified candidates form the list and that makes the list filtered.


5.1 Recruitment & the culture

In every profession, there's a hierarchy of common strategies that organizational leaders can select from and implement to meet the needs of their organization.
In the recruiting profession, the strategy at the top of the hierarchy is a "recruiting culture" strategy. Nicknamed by many as "the ultimate strategy," a recruiting culture strategy is one that transforms every employee into a 24/7 talent scout. Visiting an organization that employs such a strategy is a take-your-breath-away experience because recruiting, rather than being some obscure function buried within the HR bureaucracy, is recognized as a primary driver of business success.
Yes, the business success, not HR success. The single factor that makes a recruiting culture unique is the realization among executives, managers, and employees that great recruiting is essential in order to "move the needle" of business success. This realization enables recruiting to permeate the very fiber of the organization. Using any criteria, building a recruiting culture should be the goal of any recruiting director worth their weight in salt.
Unfortunately, recruiting cultures are beyond the capabilities or even interests of most recruiting directors, and as a result, they're as scarce as tofu .From observation, there have only been a handful of recruiting cultures developed in recent history. Each has been a true work of art convincing the entire organization from the CEO on down that recruiting is so critical that everyone must be an active talent scout.
Hey Netra,

I am also uploading a document which will give more detailed explanation on EEO Report of Red River Radio Network.
Attached Files
File Type: pdf EEO Report of Red River Radio Network.pdf (107.8 KB, 0 views)
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