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Netra Shetty
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Human Resource Management of Kerr-McGee - January 27th, 2011

The Kerr-McGee Corporation, founded in 1929, was an energy company involved in the exploration and production of oil and gas. On June 23, 2006, Houston-based Anadarko Petroleum Corporation agreed to acquire Kerr-McGee in an all-cash transaction totaling $16.5 billion plus the assumption of $2.6 billion in debt. Kerr-McGee shareholders voted to approve the offer on August 10, 2006 and Kerr-McGee ceased to exist as an independent entity. As a result of the takeover, all operations (with the exception of Tronox which was spun off as a separate company in 2005) moved out of Oklahoma.


The developments in the field of human resource management (HRM) are now well documented (see for example, 1995; 1999; 1998; 1999; 2000). Nevertheless, the debate on HRM issues continues even though its focus has changed over time. The main issue which occupied academics in the 1980s was the evolution of HRM. In this regard, the debate was mainly on the exploration of the salient aspects of the transformation of personnel management into HRM. Having done so, it moved on to issues pertaining to the incorporation of industrial relations into HRM ( 1991); then the integration of HRM into business strategies, devolvement of HRM to line managers ( 1997; 1997), and finally seeing HRM as a source of competitive advantage for organisations (see for example, 1991; 1984; 1994).

There is an ongoing debate regarding the contribution of HRM to a firm’s performance ( 1997; 1995; 1995; 1999). The HR department began to really emerge during the second decade of the twentieth century with drastic changes in technology, the growth of organizations, the rise of unions, and government concern and intervention concerning working people. In line with this section’s subject, the grievances and disciplining of human resources has also been an issue of much discussion among human resource (HR) managers. (2002) observed that how successfully an organisation manages its human resources depends to a large extent on its ability to deal effectively with developing internal systems like a grievance procedure to minimise complaints and discipline measures to ensure compliance within the organisation.

HRM) is the function within an organization that focuses on recruitment of, ma
nagement of, and providing direction for the people who work in the organization
. Human Resource Management can also be performed by line managers. Human Resour
ce Management is the organizational function that deals with issues related to p
eople such as compensation, hiring, performance management, organization develop
ment, safety, wellness, benefits, employee motivation, communication, administra
tion, and training.
and key among them is deciding what staffing needs you have and whether to use i
ndependent contractors or hire employees to fill these needs, recruiting and tra
ining the best employees, ensuring they are high performers, dealing with perfor
mance issues, and ensuring your personnel and management practices conform to va
rious regulations. Activities also include managing your approach to employee be
nefits and compensation, employee records and personnel policies. Usually small
businesses (for-profit or nonprofit) have to carry out these activities themselv
es because they can ��t yet afford part- or full-time help. However, they should a
lways ensure that employees have -- and are aware of -- personnel policies which
conform to current regulations. These policies are often in the form of employe
e manuals, which all employees have.
The HRM function and HRD profession have undergone tremendous change over the pa
st 20-30 years. Many years ago, large organizations looked to the "Personnel Dep
artment," mostly to manage the paperwork around hiring and paying people. More r
ecently, organizations consider the "HR Department" as playing a major role in s
taffing, training and helping to manage people so that people and the organizati
on are performing at maximum capability in a highly fulfilling manner.
8.4 Managers
A classic definition is that “Leaders do the right thing and managers do things
right.” A more standard definition is usually something like “managers work towa
rd the organization’s goals using its resources in an effective and efficient ma
nner.” In a traditional sense, large organizations may have different levels of
managers, including top managers, middle managers and first-line managers. Top (
or executive) managers are responsible for overseeing the whole organization and
typically engage in more strategic and conceptual matters, with less attention
to day-to-day detail. Top managers have middle managers working for them and who
are in charge of a major function or department. Middle managers may have first
-line managers working for them and who are responsible to manage the day-to-day
activities of a group of workers. Note that you can also have different types o
f managers across the same levels in the organization. A project manager is in c
harge of developing a certain project, e.g., development of a new building.
A functional manager is in charge of a major function, such as a department in t
he organization, e.g., marketing, sales, engineering, finance, etc. A product ma
nager is in charge of a product or service. Similarly, a product line manager is
in charge of a group of closely related products. General managers are in charg
e of numerous functions within an organization or department.
8.5 Supervisors
(This is a widely misunderstood term. Many people believe it applies only to peo
ple who oversee the productivity and development of entry-level workers. That ��s
not true.) The term "supervisor" typically refers to one’s immediate superior in
the workplace, that is, the person whom you report directly to in the organizat
ion. For example, a middle manager’s supervisor typically would be a top manager
. A first-line manager’s supervisor would be a middle manager. A worker’s superv
isor typically would be a first-line manager.
Supervisors typically are responsible for their direct reports �� progress and pro
ductivity in the organization. Supervision often includes conducting basic manag
ement skills (decision making, problem solving, planning, delegation and meeting
management), organizing teams, noticing the need for and designing new job role
s in the group, hiring new employees, training new employees, employee performan
ce management (setting goals, observing and giving feedback, addressing performa
nce issues, firing employees, etc.) and ensuring conformance to personnel polici
es and other internal regulations.
Supervisors typically have strong working knowledge of the activities in their g
roup, e.g., how to develop their product, carry out their service, etc. Many als
o use the term "supervisor" to designate the managerial position that is respons
ible for a major function in the organization, for example, Supervisor of Custom
er Service.
8.6 Work Directors
Work directors directly oversee the work of their subordinates. They carry out t
heir oversight role by specifically assigning work and then closely monitoring t
o ensure the work is carried out according to their wishes. Often, people work t
heir way up through management levels by starting out as work directors. Over ti
me, they develop skills in delegation, which frees them up from having to closel
y monitor the work of their subordinates and, instead, to attend to more high-le
vel managerial activities. Work directors are not always at lower levels of the
organization. For example, a middle- or upper-level manager who has poorly devel
oped delegation skills might still be interpreted as work directing her or his s
ubordinates.
8.7 Leaders
Very simply put, a leader is interpreted as someone who sets direction in an eff
ort and influences people to follow that direction. They set direction by develo
ping a clear vision and mission, and conducting planning that determines the goa
ls needed to achieve the vision and mission. They motivate by using a variety of
methods, including facilitation, coaching, mentoring, directing, delegating, et
c. As noted above, one of the four key functions of management is leading (along
with planning, organizing and controlling). Leaders carry out their roles in a
wide variety of styles, e.g., autocratic, democratic, participatory, laissez-fai
re (hands off), etc. Often, the leadership style depends on the situation, inclu
ding the life cycle of the organization. There are many views about what charact
eristics and traits that leaders should have. There are also numerous theories a
bout leadership, or about carrying out the role of leader, e.g., servant leader,
democratic leader, principle-centered leader, group-man theory, great-man theor
y, traits theory, visionary leader, total leader, situational leader.
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Re: Human Resource Management of Kerr-McGee
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James Cord
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Re: Human Resource Management of Kerr-McGee - March 29th, 2016

Quote:
Originally Posted by netrashetty View Post
The Kerr-McGee Corporation, founded in 1929, was an energy company involved in the exploration and production of oil and gas. On June 23, 2006, Houston-based Anadarko Petroleum Corporation agreed to acquire Kerr-McGee in an all-cash transaction totaling $16.5 billion plus the assumption of $2.6 billion in debt. Kerr-McGee shareholders voted to approve the offer on August 10, 2006 and Kerr-McGee ceased to exist as an independent entity. As a result of the takeover, all operations (with the exception of Tronox which was spun off as a separate company in 2005) moved out of Oklahoma.


The developments in the field of human resource management (HRM) are now well documented (see for example, 1995; 1999; 1998; 1999; 2000). Nevertheless, the debate on HRM issues continues even though its focus has changed over time. The main issue which occupied academics in the 1980s was the evolution of HRM. In this regard, the debate was mainly on the exploration of the salient aspects of the transformation of personnel management into HRM. Having done so, it moved on to issues pertaining to the incorporation of industrial relations into HRM ( 1991); then the integration of HRM into business strategies, devolvement of HRM to line managers ( 1997; 1997), and finally seeing HRM as a source of competitive advantage for organisations (see for example, 1991; 1984; 1994).

There is an ongoing debate regarding the contribution of HRM to a firmís performance ( 1997; 1995; 1995; 1999). The HR department began to really emerge during the second decade of the twentieth century with drastic changes in technology, the growth of organizations, the rise of unions, and government concern and intervention concerning working people. In line with this sectionís subject, the grievances and disciplining of human resources has also been an issue of much discussion among human resource (HR) managers. (2002) observed that how successfully an organisation manages its human resources depends to a large extent on its ability to deal effectively with developing internal systems like a grievance procedure to minimise complaints and discipline measures to ensure compliance within the organisation.

HRM) is the function within an organization that focuses on recruitment of, ma
nagement of, and providing direction for the people who work in the organization
. Human Resource Management can also be performed by line managers. Human Resour
ce Management is the organizational function that deals with issues related to p
eople such as compensation, hiring, performance management, organization develop
ment, safety, wellness, benefits, employee motivation, communication, administra
tion, and training.
and key among them is deciding what staffing needs you have and whether to use i
ndependent contractors or hire employees to fill these needs, recruiting and tra
ining the best employees, ensuring they are high performers, dealing with perfor
mance issues, and ensuring your personnel and management practices conform to va
rious regulations. Activities also include managing your approach to employee be
nefits and compensation, employee records and personnel policies. Usually small
businesses (for-profit or nonprofit) have to carry out these activities themselv
es because they can ��t yet afford part- or full-time help. However, they should a
lways ensure that employees have -- and are aware of -- personnel policies which
conform to current regulations. These policies are often in the form of employe
e manuals, which all employees have.
The HRM function and HRD profession have undergone tremendous change over the pa
st 20-30 years. Many years ago, large organizations looked to the "Personnel Dep
artment," mostly to manage the paperwork around hiring and paying people. More r
ecently, organizations consider the "HR Department" as playing a major role in s
taffing, training and helping to manage people so that people and the organizati
on are performing at maximum capability in a highly fulfilling manner.
8.4 Managers
A classic definition is that ďLeaders do the right thing and managers do things
right.Ē A more standard definition is usually something like ďmanagers work towa
rd the organizationís goals using its resources in an effective and efficient ma
nner.Ē In a traditional sense, large organizations may have different levels of
managers, including top managers, middle managers and first-line managers. Top (
or executive) managers are responsible for overseeing the whole organization and
typically engage in more strategic and conceptual matters, with less attention
to day-to-day detail. Top managers have middle managers working for them and who
are in charge of a major function or department. Middle managers may have first
-line managers working for them and who are responsible to manage the day-to-day
activities of a group of workers. Note that you can also have different types o
f managers across the same levels in the organization. A project manager is in c
harge of developing a certain project, e.g., development of a new building.
A functional manager is in charge of a major function, such as a department in t
he organization, e.g., marketing, sales, engineering, finance, etc. A product ma
nager is in charge of a product or service. Similarly, a product line manager is
in charge of a group of closely related products. General managers are in charg
e of numerous functions within an organization or department.
8.5 Supervisors
(This is a widely misunderstood term. Many people believe it applies only to peo
ple who oversee the productivity and development of entry-level workers. That ��s
not true.) The term "supervisor" typically refers to oneís immediate superior in
the workplace, that is, the person whom you report directly to in the organizat
ion. For example, a middle managerís supervisor typically would be a top manager
. A first-line managerís supervisor would be a middle manager. A workerís superv
isor typically would be a first-line manager.
Supervisors typically are responsible for their direct reports �� progress and pro
ductivity in the organization. Supervision often includes conducting basic manag
ement skills (decision making, problem solving, planning, delegation and meeting
management), organizing teams, noticing the need for and designing new job role
s in the group, hiring new employees, training new employees, employee performan
ce management (setting goals, observing and giving feedback, addressing performa
nce issues, firing employees, etc.) and ensuring conformance to personnel polici
es and other internal regulations.
Supervisors typically have strong working knowledge of the activities in their g
roup, e.g., how to develop their product, carry out their service, etc. Many als
o use the term "supervisor" to designate the managerial position that is respons
ible for a major function in the organization, for example, Supervisor of Custom
er Service.
8.6 Work Directors
Work directors directly oversee the work of their subordinates. They carry out t
heir oversight role by specifically assigning work and then closely monitoring t
o ensure the work is carried out according to their wishes. Often, people work t
heir way up through management levels by starting out as work directors. Over ti
me, they develop skills in delegation, which frees them up from having to closel
y monitor the work of their subordinates and, instead, to attend to more high-le
vel managerial activities. Work directors are not always at lower levels of the
organization. For example, a middle- or upper-level manager who has poorly devel
oped delegation skills might still be interpreted as work directing her or his s
ubordinates.
8.7 Leaders
Very simply put, a leader is interpreted as someone who sets direction in an eff
ort and influences people to follow that direction. They set direction by develo
ping a clear vision and mission, and conducting planning that determines the goa
ls needed to achieve the vision and mission. They motivate by using a variety of
methods, including facilitation, coaching, mentoring, directing, delegating, et
c. As noted above, one of the four key functions of management is leading (along
with planning, organizing and controlling). Leaders carry out their roles in a
wide variety of styles, e.g., autocratic, democratic, participatory, laissez-fai
re (hands off), etc. Often, the leadership style depends on the situation, inclu
ding the life cycle of the organization. There are many views about what charact
eristics and traits that leaders should have. There are also numerous theories a
bout leadership, or about carrying out the role of leader, e.g., servant leader,
democratic leader, principle-centered leader, group-man theory, great-man theor
y, traits theory, visionary leader, total leader, situational leader.
hey netra,

Here i am uploading Purpose of the Restoration - Kerr-McGee Chemical Corp, so please download and check it.
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